Courses

The department offers courses in economic theory as well as a variety of electives, including international, monetary and financial economics. The department also offers business management courses appropriate to the college’s liberal arts curriculum that are open to all interested students. 

AP/IB/transfer credit

  • Students may receive credit for Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or coursework at other colleges. Students who have such credit and plan to take additional economics courses at Agnes Scott should consult with the department chair about optimal course selection.
  • AP: Students who have earned a 4 or 5 on the AP Macro (or Micro) exam will receive credit for Econ 104 (or 105) AND 4 hours of credit. Students with a 4 or 5 on the AP Micro and Macro exams may start in Econ 306 and Econ 307 (skipping Econ 104 and 105 and earning 8 hours of credit). 
  • IB: Students with a 5, 6, or 7 on the IB exam should consult with their adviser and the department chair but typically receive 6 hours of credit and skip the introductory courses.

A-level exams: Students who receive an A or a B on the A-level exam in economics should consult with their adviser and the department chair but typically receive 6 hours of credit and skip the introductory courses. The department does not give credit for the AS-level exam.

Transfer credit: Students who have taken economics courses at another college may receive credit towards graduation at Agnes Scott upon the approval of the department chair. 

Study abroad: Students may receive credit for courses taken on an approved study-abroad experience. Students should meet with the department chair in advance of studying abroad.

Economics Courses

ECO-104 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)
Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105 INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)
Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scare resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

ECO-206 MICROECONOMICS (4)
Advanced study of the operation of markets with emphasis on consumer-demand theory, theory of the firm, differing market structures and the pricing and employment of inputs. General equilibrium and the role of the government in markets are discussed.
Prerequisite: ECO-104, ECO-105, and a course in calculus

ECO-207 MACROECONOMICS (4)
General model is developed to analyze theories of inflation and unemployment. Evaluation of theoretical bases for different monetary and fiscal policies.
Prerequisite: ECO-104 and ECO-105 (MAT-118 strongly recommended)

ECO-215 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4)
Introduction to the basic concepts of statistical analysis used in business and economics, including descriptive statistics, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, statistical inference, estimation, hypotheses testing, linear regression and an introduction to the use of statistical software packages.
Prerequisite: ECO-104 or ECO-105

ECO-303 LABOR ECONOMICS (4)
Study of how wage and employment levels are determined. The course will stress the application of economic theory to important policy issues such as immigration, executive compensation, unions, minimum wage laws, welfare policies, occupational health and safety standards and antidiscrimination policies.
Prerequisite: ECO-105 (ECO-206 recommended)

ECO-309 MONEY, BANKING AND FINANCIAL MARKETS (4)
Evolution of the banking system and financial markets and related issues of public policy. Analysis of monetary policy and its impact on economic activity.
Prerequisite: ECO-104 (ECO-207 recommended)

ECO-330 POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION (4)
This seminar examines selected topics on poverty, discrimination and the distribution of income including the nature and extent of poverty in the United States, race and sex discrimination in the workplace and changes in the distribution of income. Special attention is focused on policy issues including affirmative action, the minimum wage and welfare reform.
Prerequisite: ECO-105, one course in statistics (ECO-338 recommended)

ECO-334 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (4)
Historical patterns and contemporary theories of economic development are used to clarify major issues such as the distribution of income, stabilization policy and problems of trade and finance.
Prerequisite: ECO-104, ECO-105

ECO-338 ECONOMETRICS (4)
Study of sampling, statistical significance, correlation and regression analysis with emphasis placed on their application to economic problems.
Prerequisite: ECO-104, ECO-105, and one course in statistics

ECO-345 HEALTH ECONOMICS (4)
This course analyzes the economics of health care in the United States with a focus on health policy. Topics include obesity, smoking, and insurance.
Prerequisite: ECO-105 (ECO-206 recommended)
(Cross-listed with PH-345)

ECO-346 BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE (4)
Study of how we enhance understanding of economic and finance theories and real economic phenomena with a behavioral approach. Students will participate in laboratory experiments to explore various topics (competitive markets, bargaining, risk and decision making, auctions, and asset markets).
Prerequisite: ECO-105

ECO-351 INTERNATIONAL TRADE (4)
This course introduces the basics and theory of international trade. Students will discuss various trade models, the welfare and distributional effects of free trade among countries, trade policy instruments, reasons for limiting trade, and economic integration.
Prerequisite: ECO-105

ECO-352 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (4)
This course will introduce the basics and theory of international finance. We will discuss the balance of payments, functioning of foreign exchange markets, automatic and policy adjustments in the balance of payments, coordination of national economic policies, and international monetary system.
Prerequisite: ECO-104

ECO-353 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS (4)
This course will discuss the role of international economic institutions in promoting trade, development and financial stability in the global economy. It will focus on three main institutions: the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization.
Prerequisite: ECO-104 and ECO-105

ECO-370 ECONOMIC INTERNSHIP (1-4)
Supervised field experience in economics or business. In addition to placement activities, students attend a weekly seminar to discuss relevant readings and experiences. Course may be 1 to 4 credit hours with instructor permission. Students do the internship during the semester they take the course except under exceptional circumstances and with instructor permission.

ECO-400 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ECONOMICS (4)
Overview of research methods and analysis of a set of current economic policy issues,with emphasis on the completion of a student-designed research project. Open only to senior majors and minors in economics and in economics and business
Prerequisite: ECO-206, ECO-207, ECO-338, and Senior standing

ECO-410 DIRECTED READING (1-4)
Directed reading courses are open to qualified juniors and seniors to pursue reading outside a program's listed courses. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

ECO-440 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-4)
Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

ECO-450 INTERNSHIP (1-4)
Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

ECO-490 SENIOR THESIS (4)
A senior thesis gives superior students the opportunity to write a thesis about a project related to particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

Business Management Courses

BUS-201 PERSONAL FINANCE (2)
This course will help students understand the time value of money, financial planning,personal investing, budgeting, tax planning, real estate financing, credit management, insurance protection, and retirement planning that provide a foundation for making informed financial decisions.

BUS-202 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT (4)
Provides a foundation for critical thinking about organization and management, for competent action as practicing managers, and for learning from our own and others’ experience. Involves an experiential exercise in organizing.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor

BUS-205 INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)
Explores how people think and behave at work from industrial/organizational perspectives. The industrial perspective examines the theory and practice of selection, training and evaluation of workers. The organizational perspective investigates employee satisfaction, motivation, leadership and cooperative processes.
Prerequisite: PSY-101 or PSY-102
(Cross-listed with PSY-205)

BUS-210 INVESTMENTS (4)
The importance of financial investments to the economy. The structure of different markets and the theories behind the pricing of certain assets explored. Students manage a hypothetical portfolio for the duration of the semester.

BUS-211 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)
An introduction to the principles of accounting theory and the application of these principles in business and government to record business transactions and journal entries.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor.

BUS-212 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)
Builds on concepts developed in BUS-211. Concentration is on the development and use of accounting information within the organization to make managerial decisions.
Prerequisite: BUS-211

BUS-225 BRIDGE TO BUSINESS (6)
Intensive three-week course introducing core business functional areas. Explores the defining assumptions, methods, and concerns of such disciplinary domains as accounting, finance, marketing, and management. Classes conducted in August on the campus of Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business. (No prerequisites or corequisites; taught by multiple professors every summer.)

BUS-230 BUSINESS LAW (4)
A study of the social, ethical, economic, and political issues that affect the legal environment of business. Topics will include our legal heritage, critical legal thinking, contracts, torts, intellectual property, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, agency, and government regulation.

BUS-240 BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (4)
Investigates business’ social and ethical responsibilities to both external and internal stakeholder groups. Topics include personal and organizational ethics, business’ relations with government, consumers, the environment and the community; and employee rights, employment discrimination and affirmative action.

BUS-320 NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (4)
An introduction to nonprofit organizations. Topics will include the history of the nonprofit sector and its place in society, the formation and governance of nonprofit organizations, financial analysis and performance measurement, and social enterprise.
Prerequisite: BUS-211

BUS-327 ORGANIZATION THEORY (4)
Examines diverse perspectives on organizations and organizing. Topics include behavioral, institutional, population ecology, resource dependence, agency, transaction cost, structuration, complexity, critical and garbage can theories.
Prerequisite: BUS-202

BUS-401 SENIOR SEMINAR IN STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (4)
An overview of the determinants of firm performance. Examines relationships between strategy, structure and environment from both positional advantage and distinctive competencies perspectives. Focal topics include differentiation, cost leadership, alliances, vertical integration, outsourcing, acquisitions, diversification, multimarket contact and corporate governance.
Prerequisite: BUS-202 and Senior standing (or instructor permission)

BUS-410 DIRECTED READING (1-4)
Directed reading courses are open to qualified juniors and seniors to pursue reading outside a program's listed courses. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

BUS-440 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-4)
Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

BUS-450 INTERNSHIP (1-4)
Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

BUS-490 SENIOR THESIS (4)
A senior thesis gives superior students the opportunity to write a thesis about a project related to particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.