Research Opportunities

Why is research something to consider? Careers in Biology requiring a Bachelors or admissions graduate schools require at least 1 year of research experience with a preference for 2 years. Medical schools prefer at least 1 semester of research experience. Beyond that, research is a way to explore a field of study you enjoy in a hands-on creative way! Talk to your academic advisor today to determine if any of these research opportunities is a good fit for you!

  1. Agnes Scott College is committed to engaging students in meaningful research experiences. To that end, the Science Center for Women is ready to assist our Scottie Scientists in finding research experiences. Set up an appointment today with Molly Embree to discuss potential options. 
  1. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has a website that allows you to search REU (research experiences for undergraduates). Most major institutions have research experiences over the summer that pay between $2000 - $5000 for a 10-12 week research intensive experience. They often house you as well. If you are accepted into one of these REU’s, this also counts as your senior seminar in the neuroscience major.

http://www.nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/reu_search.jsp

  1. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) have great research opportunities for the summer and for post-bac years. Research at the NIH is a great resume builder! Depending on the hours worked and the experience, this could count as a senior seminar in the neuroscience major.

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/sip

  1. The Centers for Diseases Control (CDC) have great research opportunities for the academic year, the summer, and for a post-bac year. Depending on the hours worked and the experience, this could count as a senior seminar in the neuroscience major.

https://www.cdc.gov/fellowships/short-term/undergraduate.html 

  1. BIO 440/BIO 450

There are academic classes you can create to gain research experience. This could be with a professor at Agnes or at an Atlanta area institution. Your research experience could gain up to 4 credit hours in a semester. These are open ended but do require a faculty sponsor.  

https://www.agnesscott.edu/academicadvising/forms.html

Faculty members in the Biology department remain committed to engaging students in meaningful research experiences. Here are some projects completed by Biology majors here at Agnes Scott!

Zik Da (Class of 2020), Lauren Neal (Class of 2020) and Zoie Wiltz (Class of 2020) carried out genomic analysis of transcriptional start sites in Drosophila eugracilis (in collaboration with GEP, Genomics Education Partnership).

Alina Ibrahim (Class of 2019). She is currently majoring in public health and is on the pre-vet track. She would one day like to work with either wildlife or exotic pets and is interested in ecology and conservation. Alina's research is on the effects of nestling sex and growth on variation in telomere length. Her research is supported by an Advantage Award from Agnes Scott College.

Vaughn Wicker (Class of 2019). At Agnes Scott he is majoring in biology and has a minor in mathematics. As such, Vaughn has a growing interest in ecology and population dynamics. Vaughn is currently looking at how nest parasites influence nestling telomere length. His research is supported by the Goizueta Foundation STEM Success Initiative.

Esinam Segbawu (Class of 2019) explored the biophysical basis of adaptation of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus to a broad range of temperatures.

Jazz Stephens (Class of 2018). She enjoys working with small animals and plans to pursue a doctorate in veterinary medicine. Jazz's project investigates how variation in incubation behavior contributes to variation in telomere length. Her research is supported by the Leonard Doerpinghaus Biology Student Excellence Fund.

Maya Djordjevich (Class of 2017). Maya analyzed videos of barn swallows feeding their 8-day old chicks. Her research investigated whether a male's level of social interactivity with his mate (measured via proximity loggers) predicted his parental behavior. She presented her work at SPARC and at the annual Wilson Ornithological Conference and she's currently contributing to a publication of her research! Maya's conference travel was supported by an Advantage Award from Agnes Scott College.

Ghida Ghanim (Class of 2017).  Ghida's research focused on a putative enhancer region for the human LAT gene that the lab had identified.  Ghida performed deletion analysis to map the boundaries of the enhancer and to define important regulatory sites within the enhancer.  She also employed CRISPR technology to delete the enhancer in order to ascertain its role in controlling LAT gene expression. 

Samantha Chiang (Class of 2016) worked on protocols for culturing and transformation of thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

Melissa Easley (Class of 2016).  Melissa worked on the project studying the -800 to -600 bp LAT promoter region, and then worked to optimize the Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay that she and Lena subsequently employed.

Lena Glowka (Class of 2015) Lena performed siRNA-mediated knock-down experiments to explore the functional contribution of the Ets-1, Elf-1 and Runx-1 transcription factors in the regulation of LAT gene expression.  In addition, Lena and Melissa Easley performed chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments to examine whether Et-1, Elf-1, and/or Runx-1 bind to the LAT promoter region.