Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the Business Management Major

Required Courses

ECO-104: Introduction to Macroeconomics (4.00)

Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105: Introduction to Microeconomics (4.00)

Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scarce resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

ECO-215: Statistics for Business and Economics (4.00)

Introduction to the basic concepts of statistical analysis used in business and economics, including descriptive statistics, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, statistical inference, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and an introduction to the use of statistical software packages.

Course requisites: ECO-104 or 105

BUS-202: Organizational Behavior Management (4.00)

This course will apply concepts from economics, sociology, psychology and social psychology to organizational problems that managers and employees face at work. This course is designed to teach students the elements of individual, group, and organizational influences on human behavior in organizations and the impact that behavior has on individual and firm performance. Promoting a strategic approach to organizational behavior, the course will cover a broad range of issues and challenges faced in effectively managing individuals and groups. Some of the course topics include creating an environment for success, managing diversity, leading others, motivating and rewarding individuals and groups, improving work performance, understanding work teams, making decisions, and coping with organizational life. The instructor will utilize a hybrid lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics.

BUS-401: Senior Seminar in Strategic Management (4.00)

An overview of the determinants of firm performance. Examines relationships between strategy, structure, and environment from both positional advantage and distinctive competencies perspectives. Focal topics include differentiation, cost leadership, alliances, vertical integration, outsourcing, acquisitions, diversification, multimarket contact, and corporate governance.

Course requisites: BUS-202 and JR or SR standing required.

Elective Courses

Choose five of the following courses (at least three must be at the 300 level):

BUS-205: Introduction to Industrial/ Organizational Psychology (4.00)

Explores how people think and behave at work from industrial/organizational perspectives. The industrial perspective examines the theory and practice of selection, training and evaluation of workers. The organizational perspective investigates employee satisfaction, motivation, leadership and cooperative processes. Cross-listed with PSY-205.

Course requisites: PSY-101 or PSY-102

BUS-210: Investments (4.00)

The importance of financial investments to the economy. The structure of different markets and the theories behind the pricing of certain assets explored. Students manage a hypothetical portfolio for the duration of the semester.

BUS-211: Financial Accounting (4.00)

Introduction to the principles of accounting theory and the application of these principles in business and government to record business transactions and journal entries. Cross-listed with ECO-211.

Course requisites: Sophomore standing (28+ credits) or instructor's permission.

BUS-225: Women's Bridge to Business (4.00)

Women's Bridge to Business (B2B) is an intensive three-week, six-credit-hour course introducing core business functional areas. The course explores the defining assumptions, methods, and concerns of such disciplinary domains as accounting, finance, marketing, and management. Classes are conducted on the campus of Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business. For more information, visit the Agnes Scott B2B website at http://www.agnesscott.edu/bridge-to-business/ and/or contact Dr. Thomas Will, Associate Professor of Management, Agnes Scott College, by emailing him at twill@agnesscott.edu.

BUS-240: Business and Society (4.00)

Investigates business' social and ethical responsibilities to both external and internal stakeholder groups. Topics include personal and organizational ethics, business' relations with government, consumers, the environment, and the community; and employee rights, employment discrimination, and affirmative action.

BUS-270: Adaptive Leadership (4.00)

Leadership is often understood to mean setting forth a vision and motivating others to join in the pursuit of that vision. Adaptive Leadership is something altogether different. Adaptive Leadership aims to enhance the group's capacity to itself identify and engage difficult challenges. Exercising Adaptive Leadership entails stepping into unknown space, taking people out of their comfort zones, questioning deeply-held group beliefs, and confronting losses associated with change. This course prepares students to exercise Adaptive Leadership by helping them appreciate the important distinction between leadership and authority and understand the complex relationship between individual action and collective capacity. Students will explore tensions associated with paradoxical pressures on leaders to be decisive and to be experimental, to be persuasive and to encourage group voice, to be an expert and to know the limits of one's expertise, to be accountable and to give the work back to the group, to be positive and to tolerate discomfort, and to be authentic and to be multiple. This course employs case-in-point teaching methodology to turn the classroom itself into a leadership laboratory.

BUS-295: Topics in Business Management (4.00)

Critical examination of a specific topic in business management, for example "Negotiations." Topics vary from year to year and the course may be repeated for credit when the content changes.

Course requisites: Sophomore standing (28+ credits) or instructor's permission.

BUS-320: Nonprofit Organizations (4.00)

An introduction to nonprofit organizations. Topics will include the history of the nonprofit sector and its place in society, the formation and governance of nonprofit organizations, fundraising and philanthropy, and social enterprise.

BUS-335: Creativity & Innovation in Organizations Management (4.00)

CREATIVITY & INNOVATION IN ORGANIZATIONS--Creativity and innovation are increasingly cited as top priorities by organizational leaders, and employers are increasingly seeing creativity skills as must-have rather than nice-to-have. Hence, the purpose of this course will be to learn and apply theory and evidence to the development of individual creativity skills, team creativity skills, and skills required to lead others in creative endeavors. Throughout, students will investigate the most common individual, interpersonal, and organizational obstacles that make it challenging to implement innovations in organizations. A combination of lecture, discussion, group work, and experiential activities will be utilized.

Course requisites: BUS-202

BUS-340: Leadership in Organizations (4.00)

This course provides a managerial perspective on leadership in organizations. Emphasis is placed on understanding the differences between Leadership and Management in areas that include: definition, communication, team building, exercising influence, decision-making, and conflict management. It will include an overview of the history of leadership, how to distinguish Managerial vs. Leadership practices, when and how to use both effectively, as well as the ethical and cultural issues leaders face in the modern workplace. The instructor will utilize a hybrid lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics. Requires sophomore standing.

BUS-345: Human Resource Management (4.00)

This course is intended to introduce students to evidence-based human resource management (HRM) and provide an introduction to the theory, policies, and practices that guide the management of human resources within organizations. An assumption of the course is that all managers are a growing part of HRM activities and all employees are affected by them. Thus, this course is designed to help students develop a framework for dealing with critical and complex human resource management issues facing today's organizations from the vantage point of the HR department, managers, and/or employees. Throughout the course, focus will be paid to the legal and ethical considerations required for effectively managing diversity.

Course requisites: BUS-202

BUS-350: Entrepreneurship (4.00)

This course analyzes such core elements of the entrepreneurial process as idea generation, opportunity recognition, feasibility analysis, business model creation, resource marshalling, and growth. In addition to these technical aspects of entrepreneurship, this course explores as well the importance of purpose, passion, and fulfillment. This course is designed for students from all majors who have an interest in entrepreneurship. Requires sophomore standing.

BUS-360: Diversity in Organizations (4.00)

This course applies concepts from organizational behavior, sociology, psychology, and social psychology to increase understanding of the concept of diversity in organizations. The purpose of this class is to introduce students to theoretical and practical ideas about diversity in organizations, reduce discrimination, and increase fairness and equality to employees, applicants, and customers. It will improve students' abilities to understand and address diversity as managers and employees. We will discuss research that is relevant to business organizations and learn about historical bases of diversity in the U.S. and in U.S. organizations. We will explore international diversity, intra-national diversity, legislation related to diversity, as well as various trends in diversity management. This is not a diversity-training course. However, some course concepts will be useful for those interested in diversity training. The instructor will utilize a lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics. Requires sophomore standing.

BUS-370: Economics and Business Mgt Internship (4.00)

Supervised field experience in economics, business, or non-profit. In addition to placement activities, students attend a weekly seminar to discuss relevant readings and experiences. Students will spend an average of at least 10 hours each week (that is, at least 130 hours over the course of the 13-week semester) on-site with an organization. Students do the internship during the semester they take the course.

BUS-375: Principles of Marketing (4.00)

This course introduces core marketing principles and practices. Topics include market segmentation, products, promotion, channels of distribution, pricing, and uses of technology in marketing. The course includes a semester-long project in which students create a marketing plan for a product or service idea.

Course requisites: BUS-202

ECO-303: Labor Economics (4.00)

Study of how wages and employment levels are determined. The course will stress the application of economic theory to important policy issues such as immigration, executive compensation, unions, minimum wage laws, welfare policies, occupational health and safety standards and antidiscrimination policies.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or 105

ECO-309: Money, Banking & Financial Markets (4.00)

Evolution of the banking system and related issues of public policy. Analysis of monetary factors and their impact on economic activity.

Course requisites: ECO-102 or 104

ECO-338: Econometrics (4.00)

Study of sampling, statistical significance, correlation and regression analysis with emphasis placed on their application to economic problems.

Course requisites: ECO 104, 105, and 1 course in statistics.

ECO-346: Behavioral Economics and Finance (4.00)

This course introduces students to regression methods for analyzing data in economics and related areas. It addresses both the theoretical and practical aspects of statistical analysis, focusing on techniques for estimating econometric models of various kinds and interpreting the estimates from such models. The objective is for the students to learn how to conduct - and how to critique - empirical studies in economics and related fields. Accordingly, the emphasis of the course is on empirical applications. The mathematics of econometrics will be introduced only as needed and will not be a central focus.

Course requisites: ECO-104 & 105

ECO-351: International Trade (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international trade. We will discuss various trade models, the welfare and distributional effects of free trade among countries, trade policy instruments, reasons for limiting trade, and economic integration.

Course requisites: Take ECO-101 or ECO-105;

ECO-352: International Finance (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international finance. We will discuss the balance of payments, functioning of foreign exchange markets, automatic and policy adjustments in the balance of payments, coordination of national economic policies, and international monetary system.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or ECO-104

Requirements for the Business Management Minor

Required Courses

BUS-202: Organizational Behavior Management (4.00)

This course will apply concepts from economics, sociology, psychology and social psychology to organizational problems that managers and employees face at work. This course is designed to teach students the elements of individual, group, and organizational influences on human behavior in organizations and the impact that behavior has on individual and firm performance. Promoting a strategic approach to organizational behavior, the course will cover a broad range of issues and challenges faced in effectively managing individuals and groups. Some of the course topics include creating an environment for success, managing diversity, leading others, motivating and rewarding individuals and groups, improving work performance, understanding work teams, making decisions, and coping with organizational life. The instructor will utilize a hybrid lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics.

BUS-401: Senior Seminar in Strategic Management (4.00)

An overview of the determinants of firm performance. Examines relationships between strategy, structure, and environment from both positional advantage and distinctive competencies perspectives. Focal topics include differentiation, cost leadership, alliances, vertical integration, outsourcing, acquisitions, diversification, multimarket contact, and corporate governance.

Course requisites: BUS-202 and JR or SR standing required.

Elective Courses

Choose three of the following courses:

BUS-205: Introduction to Industrial/ Organizational Psychology (4.00)

Explores how people think and behave at work from industrial/organizational perspectives. The industrial perspective examines the theory and practice of selection, training and evaluation of workers. The organizational perspective investigates employee satisfaction, motivation, leadership and cooperative processes. Cross-listed with PSY-205.

Course requisites: PSY-101 or PSY-102

BUS-210: Investments (4.00)

The importance of financial investments to the economy. The structure of different markets and the theories behind the pricing of certain assets explored. Students manage a hypothetical portfolio for the duration of the semester.

BUS-211: Financial Accounting (4.00)

Introduction to the principles of accounting theory and the application of these principles in business and government to record business transactions and journal entries. Cross-listed with ECO-211.

Course requisites: Sophomore standing (28+ credits) or instructor's permission.

BUS-225: Women's Bridge to Business (4.00)

Women's Bridge to Business (B2B) is an intensive three-week, six-credit-hour course introducing core business functional areas. The course explores the defining assumptions, methods, and concerns of such disciplinary domains as accounting, finance, marketing, and management. Classes are conducted on the campus of Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business. For more information, visit the Agnes Scott B2B website at http://www.agnesscott.edu/bridge-to-business/ and/or contact Dr. Thomas Will, Associate Professor of Management, Agnes Scott College, by emailing him at twill@agnesscott.edu.

BUS-240: Business and Society (4.00)

Investigates business' social and ethical responsibilities to both external and internal stakeholder groups. Topics include personal and organizational ethics, business' relations with government, consumers, the environment, and the community; and employee rights, employment discrimination, and affirmative action.

BUS-270: Adaptive Leadership (4.00)

Leadership is often understood to mean setting forth a vision and motivating others to join in the pursuit of that vision. Adaptive Leadership is something altogether different. Adaptive Leadership aims to enhance the group's capacity to itself identify and engage difficult challenges. Exercising Adaptive Leadership entails stepping into unknown space, taking people out of their comfort zones, questioning deeply-held group beliefs, and confronting losses associated with change. This course prepares students to exercise Adaptive Leadership by helping them appreciate the important distinction between leadership and authority and understand the complex relationship between individual action and collective capacity. Students will explore tensions associated with paradoxical pressures on leaders to be decisive and to be experimental, to be persuasive and to encourage group voice, to be an expert and to know the limits of one's expertise, to be accountable and to give the work back to the group, to be positive and to tolerate discomfort, and to be authentic and to be multiple. This course employs case-in-point teaching methodology to turn the classroom itself into a leadership laboratory.

BUS-295: Topics in Business Management (4.00)

Critical examination of a specific topic in business management, for example "Negotiations." Topics vary from year to year and the course may be repeated for credit when the content changes.

Course requisites: Sophomore standing (28+ credits) or instructor's permission.

BUS-320: Nonprofit Organizations (4.00)

An introduction to nonprofit organizations. Topics will include the history of the nonprofit sector and its place in society, the formation and governance of nonprofit organizations, fundraising and philanthropy, and social enterprise.

BUS-335: Creativity & Innovation in Organizations Management (4.00)

CREATIVITY & INNOVATION IN ORGANIZATIONS--Creativity and innovation are increasingly cited as top priorities by organizational leaders, and employers are increasingly seeing creativity skills as must-have rather than nice-to-have. Hence, the purpose of this course will be to learn and apply theory and evidence to the development of individual creativity skills, team creativity skills, and skills required to lead others in creative endeavors. Throughout, students will investigate the most common individual, interpersonal, and organizational obstacles that make it challenging to implement innovations in organizations. A combination of lecture, discussion, group work, and experiential activities will be utilized.

Course requisites: BUS-202

BUS-340: Leadership in Organizations (4.00)

This course provides a managerial perspective on leadership in organizations. Emphasis is placed on understanding the differences between Leadership and Management in areas that include: definition, communication, team building, exercising influence, decision-making, and conflict management. It will include an overview of the history of leadership, how to distinguish Managerial vs. Leadership practices, when and how to use both effectively, as well as the ethical and cultural issues leaders face in the modern workplace. The instructor will utilize a hybrid lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics. Requires sophomore standing.

BUS-345: Human Resource Management (4.00)

This course is intended to introduce students to evidence-based human resource management (HRM) and provide an introduction to the theory, policies, and practices that guide the management of human resources within organizations. An assumption of the course is that all managers are a growing part of HRM activities and all employees are affected by them. Thus, this course is designed to help students develop a framework for dealing with critical and complex human resource management issues facing today's organizations from the vantage point of the HR department, managers, and/or employees. Throughout the course, focus will be paid to the legal and ethical considerations required for effectively managing diversity.

Course requisites: BUS-202

BUS-350: Entrepreneurship (4.00)

This course analyzes such core elements of the entrepreneurial process as idea generation, opportunity recognition, feasibility analysis, business model creation, resource marshalling, and growth. In addition to these technical aspects of entrepreneurship, this course explores as well the importance of purpose, passion, and fulfillment. This course is designed for students from all majors who have an interest in entrepreneurship. Requires sophomore standing.

BUS-360: Diversity in Organizations (4.00)

This course applies concepts from organizational behavior, sociology, psychology, and social psychology to increase understanding of the concept of diversity in organizations. The purpose of this class is to introduce students to theoretical and practical ideas about diversity in organizations, reduce discrimination, and increase fairness and equality to employees, applicants, and customers. It will improve students' abilities to understand and address diversity as managers and employees. We will discuss research that is relevant to business organizations and learn about historical bases of diversity in the U.S. and in U.S. organizations. We will explore international diversity, intra-national diversity, legislation related to diversity, as well as various trends in diversity management. This is not a diversity-training course. However, some course concepts will be useful for those interested in diversity training. The instructor will utilize a lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics. Requires sophomore standing.

BUS-370: Economics and Business Mgt Internship (4.00)

Supervised field experience in economics, business, or non-profit. In addition to placement activities, students attend a weekly seminar to discuss relevant readings and experiences. Students will spend an average of at least 10 hours each week (that is, at least 130 hours over the course of the 13-week semester) on-site with an organization. Students do the internship during the semester they take the course.

BUS-375: Principles of Marketing (4.00)

This course introduces core marketing principles and practices. Topics include market segmentation, products, promotion, channels of distribution, pricing, and uses of technology in marketing. The course includes a semester-long project in which students create a marketing plan for a product or service idea.

Course requisites: BUS-202

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