Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the Public Health Major

52 credit hours: Core (32) , electives (20). At least two elective courses must be at 300 level or above.

Core Courses

  • Take PH-331 or PH-332
  • Take BIO-110/Lab or BIO-101

PH-101: Survey of Public Health (4.00)

Survey course that introduces the subdisciplines of public health. Introduces epidemiological, environmental, occupational, cultural, behavioral, and policy issues relevant to the health of populations around the world. Includes a historical context for current health issues and global practices.

PH-210: Biostatistics (4.00)

Basic principles of statistics and their application in a public health context. Topics include generating hypotheses, analyzing data and interpreting results, and communicating findings to scientific and non-scientific audiences.

Course requisites: PH-101

PH-211: Principles of Epidemiology (4.00)

Analysis of the distribution, determinants, and prevention of disease, disability and premature death in populations. Includes quantitative analysis of the biological, social, economic, and environmental conditions that affect health, as well as an examination of potential bias in studies.

Course requisites: PH-101 & Statistics (PH-210, MAT-115 or PSY-206)

PH-240: Medical Anthropology (4.00)

This course provides an introduction to medical anthropology, incorporating both cultural and biological approaches to the subfield. The course will examine the variation of experience, meaning, and response to human health and illness across cultures. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of theoretical concepts in medical anthropology to public health and development work. Cross-listed with ANT-240.

Course requisites: Take ANT-101 PH-101 or SOC-101

PH-311: Global Health (4.00)

Continues from introduction to public health and epidemiology to infectious and chronic disease in terms of global prevalence. Case studies, theory, and methods about health from a multidisciplinary perspective. The relation of biological, economic, political, cultural, and behavior factors to disease spread and management.

Course requisites: PH-101 and PH-211 required prerequisites.

PH-375: Public Health Design & Evaluation (4.00)

This course guides students through the process of public health intervention design, from needs assessment to evaluation. Students work in groups mentored by the course instructor to develop and pilot research instruments and study protocols, simulating public health working environments.

Course requisites: PH-311 Global Health

PH-331: Environmental Health (4.00)

An interdisciplinary, scientific survey of human interactions with the natural and built environments of the earth, and how anthropogenic stressors can ultimately influence public health and environmental quality. Physical and social environments are important determinants of the health of individuals and communities. Exposure to chemical, biological and physical agents can and do occur through the air, water and soil that comprise our physical environment. Particular emphasis in this course will be placed on describing (1) what pollution is and how/why it is harmful, (2) what the root sources and causes of pollution are, (3) what happens to pollutants when they enter the environment, and (4) how each pollutant class affects individual and community health over acute to chronic exposure periods. Cross-listed with ESS-331.

Course requisites: Take PH-101 or ESS-101 for Environmental Health topic

PH-332: Health Policy (4.00)

This course will introduce students to different models of health care delivery and finance, including universal, single-payer, privatized, and "out-of-pocket" systems. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of different health care models with attention to cost, quality, access, ethics, and human rights. They will also discuss the socio-cultural, historical, economic, and political factors that led countries to adopt different health systems, including the United States. The course addresses leadership in the field of health policy and management, in both domestic and global settings. T.R. Reid's The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper and Fairer Health Care, will be supplemented with academic analyses and policy briefs. Students will complete projects on the U.S. health care reform and at least one other international health system. This course provides an additional topical offering for PH-331, which will provide students with a choice of topic and also expands the curriculum to cover all of the major subdisciplines of public health.

Course requisites: PH-101

BIO-110: Integrative Biology I (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function as they relate to ecology, evolution and genetics. Inquiry-based approaches to problem solving in science. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & BIO-110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-110L: Integrative Biology I LAB (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-110; must be taken concurrently with BIO-110.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & 110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-101: Making Sense of Life: Biology for Life (4.00)

The seemingly unlikely fact that life exists and flourishes is approached through understanding the organizing principles of biological systems and the process of scientific discovery. This course aims for life-long scientific (biological) literacy, an appreciation of life in all of its forms and an understanding of our role in shaping the world for the health and well-being of ourselves and future generations.

Electives (choose five)

PH-202: Environ and Public Health Communication (4.00)

Examines and develops communication practices associated with current issues and controversies. Focus on communication as related to public and environmental health, especially as directed to target populations and advocacy. Final project related to a student's academic interest. Cross-listed with ESS-202.

Course requisites: Take ENG-110;

PH-225: Topics in Women's Health (4.00)

This course will examine women's health issues from scientific and sociopolitical perspectives. Cross-listed with WS-225.

PH-226: Maternal and Reproductive Health (4.00)

This course employs a liberal arts approach, introducing multiple disciplinary perspectives on maternal and reproductive health topics, including pregnancy and childbirth, family planning, infertility and reproductive technologies. It will foster increased understanding of socio-cultural, biological, economic, environmental and historical influences on health, and encourage students to think critically about technical, financial, ethical and gendered aspects of intervention strategies. The course employs a case study approach; students will discuss real-life examples of maternal and reproductive health interventions, policies and ethical dilemmas. Cross-listed with WS-226.

PH-330: Social & Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (4.00)

This course covers select behavioral and social science theories in their application to public health research and practice. Includes an introduction to and critical analysis of selected social and behavioral science theories and methods, and considers their application to improve population health in ways that are appropriate for the context.

Course requisites: PH-211

PH-331: Environmental Health (4.00)

An interdisciplinary, scientific survey of human interactions with the natural and built environments of the earth, and how anthropogenic stressors can ultimately influence public health and environmental quality. Physical and social environments are important determinants of the health of individuals and communities. Exposure to chemical, biological and physical agents can and do occur through the air, water and soil that comprise our physical environment. Particular emphasis in this course will be placed on describing (1) what pollution is and how/why it is harmful, (2) what the root sources and causes of pollution are, (3) what happens to pollutants when they enter the environment, and (4) how each pollutant class affects individual and community health over acute to chronic exposure periods. Cross-listed with ESS-331.

Course requisites: Take PH-101 or ESS-101 for Environmental Health topic

PH-332: Health Policy (4.00)

This course will introduce students to different models of health care delivery and finance, including universal, single-payer, privatized, and "out-of-pocket" systems. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of different health care models with attention to cost, quality, access, ethics, and human rights. They will also discuss the socio-cultural, historical, economic, and political factors that led countries to adopt different health systems, including the United States. The course addresses leadership in the field of health policy and management, in both domestic and global settings. T.R. Reid's The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper and Fairer Health Care, will be supplemented with academic analyses and policy briefs. Students will complete projects on the U.S. health care reform and at least one other international health system. This course provides an additional topical offering for PH-331, which will provide students with a choice of topic and also expands the curriculum to cover all of the major subdisciplines of public health.

Course requisites: PH-101

PH-335: Laboratory Techniques Public Health (4.00)

This laboratory course is a hands-on experimental experience investigating an original Environmental Health program utilizing two or more common instrumental techniques such as absorption and emission spectroscopies, chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Students will identify a scientific question, formulate an experimental design, and conduct experiments. Students will also gain experience on obtaining and preparing samples, analyzing and interpreting data, and drawing valid conclusions based on experimental results. Prerequisites: PH-101, CHE-220, and CHE-230. Cross-listed with CHE-335.

Course requisites: PH-211, CHE-220 and CHE-230

PH-345: Health Economics (4.00)

This course analyzes the economics of health care in the United States with a focus on health policy. Topics include obesity, smoking, and insurance. Cross-listed with ECO-345.

Course requisites: ECO-105

PH-350: Anthropology of Violence (4.00)

This course explores violence across the modern world, including political, structural, symbolic, and "everyday violence." Case studies of genocide, ethnocide, femicide, and rape will be considered through a human rights framework, with particular emphasis on reparation, rebuilding, and prevention. Cross-listed with ANT-350.

Course requisites: Take 1: ANT/PH/SOC-101 or REL/POL-125

PH-363: A History of Health & Healing in Africa (4.00)

A HISTORY OF HEALTH & HEALING IN AFRICA--Seminar on the history of disease, health and healing in Africa. In this course we consider the intersections between knowledge production, power, race, and class in African history. Cross-listed with AS/HIS-363.

PH-372: Affordable & Sustainable Healthcare Tech (4.00)

This interdisciplinary course will provide an overview of the key issues involved in the introduction of sustainable healthcare technology in resource-constrained regions. The course combines lectures on critical concepts in affordable health care technology development and implementation, including context and needs evaluation, supply chain infrastructure and usability design, financial sustainability, and the ethics of low-cost healthcare provision, with practical learning. Through close faculty mentorship, small groups of students will work in mixed-discipline teams (in partnership with Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology) to create a solution to an identified real-world health problem, such as delivering clean water or perinatal monitoring. Students will develop applications for mobile-based devices in recognition that such technologies are increasingly relied upon as a rapid route to implementing and deploying healthcare solutions (mHealth.) Organizations based in relevant resource-constrained settings will be identified which can provide feedback and detailed information important to the solutions; wherever possible, pilot implementation of student developed apps will be facilitated with local partners at the conclusion of the course. Cross-listed with ANT-372.

Course requisites: One of the following courses: PH-211, PH/ANT-240, ANT/SOC-390, or PHY/MAT-131

PH-395: Topics in Public Health (4.00)

TOPICS IN PUBLIC HEALTH--This course will offer a rotating selection of topics in public health. Students enrolled will have a background in Public Health and will be able to explore areas of public health which might include Health Disparities, Mental Health, etc. PH-395 may be repeated if the topic changes.

Description for "GEOGRAPHIES OF HEALTH AND DISEASE"--The course explores how geographic concepts - space, place, location, movement, environment, and region -- can help us to better understand health. Students will gain the knowledge necessary to think critically about spatial processes relating to health and healthcare. Students will also have opportunities to apply socio-spatial thinking to specific issues in public health through case studies and original research. The course is highly interdisciplinary and applied. Topics include GIS, globalization, im/migration, "modernization," urbanization, (political) disease ecology, pandemic diffusion, spatial epidemiology, biometeorology, health care delivery, health resource planning, and telemedicine.

Description for "COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH PRACTICE AND RESEARCH"--This course is designed as an overview of community-based health practice and research and will familiarize students with key historical underpinnings of community-based health practice; principles of community-based participatory research; methodological considerations in building community partnerships and community coalitions; community assessment; research planning, data gathering and data sharing. The course will also address cultural competence; working with diverse populations; and ethical issues in community-based health practice and research.

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Course requisites: PH-101 and PH-211

PH-410: Directed Reading (1.00)

DIRECTED READING--Directed reading courses are offered by all academic programs and are open to qualified juniors and seniors to pursue reading outside a program's listed courses. Non-majors who demonstrate sufficient preparation in the discipline may also take 410 courses. Applications to take directed reading are available in the Office of Academic Advising and must be returned to the assistant dean of the college for approval. A 410 course carries one to four semester-hours credit. Ordinarily, a student will take no more than two semester courses of directed reading. The application should include the name of the instructor who will offer the 410, the course title,a description of the topic to be studied, a statement of the student's preparation for such study and the basis for the grade. The instructor must endorse the application, as well as the chair of the department or director of the program offering the 410. If a student wishes to take a 410 outside her major program, her application also must describe her preparation in the program offering the 410.

PH-440: Directed Research (4.00)

Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to a particular field of intellectual or artistic interest, or to non-majors who demonstrate sufficient preparation in the discipline. Applications are available in the Office of Academic Advising and must be returned to the assistant dean of the college for approval. A 440 course carries 4 semester-hours credit.

ANT-101: Cultural Anthropology (4.00)

Overview of cultural universals and cultural diversity, using comparative analysis of African, American, Asian and other cultures. Examination of the impact of contact between cultures and the contemporary condition of indigenous peoples, using case studies (ethnographies), ethnographic film and class activities.

ANT-214: Anthropology of Religion (4.00)

This course examines the nature of religious institutions, rituals, beliefs, and experiences. By drawing upon anthropological theories of religion and selected ethnographies, we seek to understand the complex interplay between the beliefs, practices, and experiences of religion(s) and the socio-cultural contexts in which they are embedded. How do religions relate to the social order? Are they reflections of it or contested sites upon which political, economic, and cultural struggles are fought? Is religion primarily a social or psychological phenomenon? What is the nature of religious rituals and what role do they play in the construction of identity? How do sex and gender inform the nature of religious experience? What are myths and symbols? In order to explore these questions, students will be asked to engage with the anthropological corpus of theoretical and ethnographic writings on religion. In addition, there will be an opportunity to apply these concepts to the students' own lived realities through field exercises that combine theoretical analysis with participant observation. Cross-listed with REL-214.

ANT-219: Transatlantic Voodoo (4.00)

Traces Voodoo/Vodun religious traditions from West Africa to the Caribbean and North America, including the history of European contact and the slave trade, European views of African religions, and the cultural and symbolic meanings of Voodoo spirits and dancing. Cross-listed with AS/REL-219.

ANT-245: Marriage, Sexuality and Power in Cross Cultural Perspective (4.00)

This course reviews marriage around the world, such as polygyny, monogamy, polyandry, and homosexual and heterosexual unions, and discusses the consequences for emotional bonds, power, sexuality, children, and financial arrangements. Cross-listed with WS-245.

ANT-301: Contemp Cult & Controversies in Lat Amer (4.00)

This course focuses on understanding the legacies of colonial and neo-colonial relationships in Latin America through exploration of current controversies and social issues. The critical reading of ethnographies from throughout the region will be central to the course.

Course requisites: ANT-101 or SOC-101

ANT-335: Anthropology of Human Rights (4.00)

Anthropology and human rights are fields that promote respect and protection of diverse and marginalized peoples around the world. How can anthropological theories and techniques be marshalled in the interest of human rights? What are the challenges to finding common ground between anthropology and human rights? This course explores the language, research, and philosophical positions underlying the work of anthropologists and human rights advocates. We will examine competing ethical positions and debates between universal rights and cultural relativism. Course topics will include cross-cultural approaches to issues such as LGBTQ rights, public health, international development, refugee rights, women's rights, civil rights, political freedom, genocide, indigenous rights, and religious freedom.

Course requisites: One of the following courses: ANT-101, PH-101, PHI-101, SOC-101, PHI-112, REL/POL/WS-125

ANT-340: Worlds of Culture: Global Ethnography (4.00)

A sample of ethnographies offering detailed anthropological studies of a range of geographic regions and cultural themes. The course probes other cultures' ways of knowing and how they deal with religion, ecology, economics, kinship, gender, health, language, and globalization.

Course requisites: Anthropology 101

ANT-345: Anthropology of Public Health (4.00)

This course examines anthropological perspectives and practices for understanding public health and medicine. It considers a variety of health issues, discourses, knowledge, and practices among different societies and social strata within various societies. It likewise explores globalization effects on health.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

ANT-354: Human Culture in Anthropological Perspective (4.00)

Advanced course on anthropological understandings of culture and humanity. Students read ethnographies and theoretical works to examine different ways of understanding behavior.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

ANT-371: Women, Health and Society (4.00)

Cross-cultural concepts of women's bodies and health, including reproduction and child care, health practitioners and disease. Focus on gender, ethnic and class differences in health, health concepts and health practices around the world and locally, as well as research methods (kinship, interviews) relating to health. Cross-listed with WS-371.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

ANT-380: Culture and Ethnography of Africa (4.00)

This course offers an examination and appreciation of African cultures in the present context and in historical perspective. Course topics include kinship, gender, politics, religion, economics, and colonialism. Students read several ethnographies for an in-depth understanding of specific cultures. Cross-listed with AS/REL-380.

Course requisites: Take 1 of these classes (ANT-101, ANT/REL/AS-219, SOC-101, AS-170, HIS-257, OR AS-140/REL-217

ANT-390: Foundations of Social Research (4.00)

Introduction to social research, including developing research questions, reviewing literature, carrying out field research and data analysis. Involves teamwork. Basic skills include kinship, ethnography, interviews and surveys. Topic varies by semester. Cross-listed with SOC-390.

Course requisites: ANT-101, SOC-101 and junior standing

ANT-391: Special Areas in Social Science Inquiry (4.00)

Topics vary by semester, according to the professor teaching the course. Each student will design and carry out a research project. Required for majors. Cross-listed with SOC-391.

Course requisites: Sociology 390 or Anthropology 390

AS-170: Afr-Amer Culture & Social Institutions (4.00)

Overall framework for the study of African Americans from slavery to the present. Aspects of the African-American experience are examined from a multidisciplinary perspective.

BIO-111: Integrative Biology II (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function using one or more current problems such as addiction and cancer as a central theme. Molecular, cellular and organismal biology and the relationship of biological issues to science and society. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: Req'd prereqs: BIO-110 & 110L; req'd coreq 111L BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111L: Integrative Biology II Lab (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-111; must be taken concurrently with BIO-111.

Course requisites: BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-201: Microbiology/Lab (4.00)

Cell biology, metabolism, genetics and phylogeny of bacteria and archaea. Introduction to eukaryotic microbes and viruses. Principles of pathogenesis, immunology and environmental microbiology. Applications in biotechnology, medicine and industry. Individual laboratory project and use of representative literature in the discipline. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111

BIO-216: Molecular Biology (3.00)

Genes and their activities at the molecular level in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation in health and disease. Advanced topics in genetic engineering and biotechnology. Emphasis on experimental strategies and data analysis. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111 BIO-216 & BIO-216L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-220: Genetics/Lab (4.00)

Structure, function, regulation and transmission of hereditary materials in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and 111

BIO-260: Bioinformatics (4.00)

An introduction to the theory and practice of bioinformatics and computational biology. Topics include: the analysis of genome sequences, comparative genomics, gene expression arrays, and proteomics. As part of this course, students carry out original, independent, computer-based bioinformatics research by annotating portions of newly sequenced genomes.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & MAT-115 (or higher math course)

BIO-270: Invertebrate Biology/Lab (4.00)

Comparative anatomy, functional morphology, systematics and evolution of major and minor invertebrate phyla to achieve an understanding of unity, diversity and evolution in these animals. Laboratory includes some fieldwork. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-192 Prerequisite

BIO-311: Disease Ecology (4.00)

Hosts, pathogens, and vectors are parts of complex ecosystems. In order to understand the impacts of disease, this course will examine the effects of disease on ecosystems (including humans) and explore the ecological and evolutionary processes that drive disease dynamics.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111 - OR - PH-101 and PH-211

BIO-317: Immunology/Lab (4.00)

Study of mammalian immune system at cellular and molecular level. Topics include: recognition of antigen, development of lymphocyte repertoire, innate and adaptive immune responses, and immune disorders such as autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & one 200-level BIO course

BIO-350: Foundations of Neuroscience I (3.00)

This course requires students to understand the basics of the nervous system at the cellular and subcellular level as well as equip students with scientific tools such as critical analysis of primary literature, development of an inquiry based project, and presentation of scientific research. Cross-listed with PSY-350.

Course requisites: BIO-350 & BIO-350L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-350L: Inquiry Based Research Neuroscience Lab (1.00)

INQUIRY BASED RESEARCH IN NEUROSCIENCE LAB--In this laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-350, students are given background material and generate their own line of scientific inquiry with tools and specific techniques explained and taught. Based on their questions and the techniques available, they will design experiments and analyze the results.

Course requisites: BIO-350 & 350L must be taken concurrently.

BUS-202: Organizational Behavior Management (4.00)

This course will apply concepts from economics, sociology, psychology and social psychology to organizational problems that managers and employees face at work. This course is designed to teach students the elements of individual, group, and organizational influences on human behavior in organizations and the impact that behavior has on individual and firm performance. Promoting a strategic approach to organizational behavior, the course will cover a broad range of issues and challenges faced in effectively managing individuals and groups. Some of the course topics include creating an environment for success, managing diversity, leading others, motivating and rewarding individuals and groups, improving work performance, understanding work teams, making decisions, and coping with organizational life. The instructor will utilize a hybrid lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics.

BUS-211: Financial Accounting (4.00)

Introduction to the principles of accounting theory and the application of these principles in business and government to record business transactions and journal entries. Cross-listed with ECO-211.

Course requisites: Sophomore standing (28+ credits) or instructor's permission.

BUS-212: Managerial Accounting (4.00)

Builds on concepts developed in 211. Concentration is on the development and use of accounting information within the organization to make managerial decisions.

Course requisites: BUS-211 or ECO-211

BUS-240: Business and Society (4.00)

Investigates business' social and ethical responsibilities to both external and internal stakeholder groups. Topics include personal and organizational ethics, business' relations with government, consumers, the environment, and the community; and employee rights, employment discrimination, and affirmative action.

BUS-320: Nonprofit Organizations (4.00)

An introduction to nonprofit organizations. Topics will include the history of the nonprofit sector and its place in society, the formation and governance of nonprofit organizations, fundraising and philanthropy, and social enterprise.

CHE-150: Introduction to Chemistry (3.00)

This course delves into the world of atoms and molecules in order to study the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. The course will provide an introduction to the field of chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, acids and bases, enthalpy, and equilibrium. In addition, contemporary problems and applications of these topics may be explored. Examples may include atomic and molecular structure relevant to the design of new material such as memory metals; stoichiometry as a means of achieving green chemistry; acids and bases in the context of biochemical and environmental reactions; enthalpy in the context of energy generating fuels; and equilibrium and its role in energy storing batteries.

Course requisites: Take CHE-150L

CHE-240: Organic Chemistry I (3.00)

The systematic study of the chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on theories of structure and reactivity. Specific topics include basic organic molecular structure and bonding, isomerism, stereochemistry, molecular energetics, substitution and elimination reactions, and reactions of biologically relevant functional groups.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240L

CHE-300: Introduction to Biochemistry/Lab (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways and regulation of biochemical processes. Fundamental biochemical laboratory techniques including spectroscopy, enzymology, chromatographic separations, and protein detection methods. Cross-listed with BIO-300.

Course requisites: CHE-240 & 240L (BIO-110/L & 111/L also prereqs for BIO mjrs)

CHE-350: Medicinal Organic Chemistry (4.00)

Drug discovery and development is the study of how biological targets for new drugs are selected, and how appropriate drugs for those targets are identified and brought to market. It is an interdisciplinary subject that draws from biology, chemistry and biochemistry to help us understand the interaction of a drug with a biological target, how the drug reaches its target in the body, and how it is eliminated once its function is achieved. Since a biologically active drug results from many years of experimental work in drug design and development, structure-activity relationships and drug structure optimization are topics also discussed in this course.

Course requisites: CHE-240 and 240L

ECO-104: Introduction to Macroeconomics (4.00)

Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105: Introduction to Microeconomics (4.00)

Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scarce resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

ECO-330: Poverty, Inequality & Discrimination (4.00)

This seminar examines selected topics on poverty, inequality and discrimination. Topics include the measurement, extent and causes of poverty in the U.S. and around the world; race and sex discrimination in the workplace; and changes in the distribution of income and wealth. Special attention is focused on policy issues including affirmative action, the minimum wage and welfare reform.

Course requisites: ECO-105 and 1 statistics course

ESS-101: Intro. to Environmental and Sustain Sustainability Studies (4.00)

Causes and effects of human incursion into natural systems. Examination of social, political, ethical and economic issues and theory in light of ecological and evolutionary principles, with a goal of developing sustainable programs.

ESS-395: Topics in Global Environmentl Challenges (4.00)

TOPICS IN GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES--Advanced topics in Environmental and Sustainability Studies, emphasizing the global aspects of such issues as population growth, availability of affordable clean water, food sources and distribution, loss of biodiversity, energy production and consumption, pollution, and climate change. May be repeated when topic changes and prerequisite/s vary. Description for "THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE"--Humans' impact on the environment has become so significant that some scientists have proposed renaming our current geological period the Anthropocene, since anthropos- is Greek for human. This course uses a feminist lens to survey environmental issues around the globe, including food scarcity, climate change, and industrial pollution and the efforts being made to counteract these problems. Description for "FOOD PRODUCTION"--An examination of our current systems of food production including large scale agribusiness, small farmers, organic farming and the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers; economic issues such as processing, shipping, and marketing of food; as well as the health and sustainability of humans, animals and the natural environment.

Course requisites: ESS-101 or PH-101

GER-330: Topics in German Film (4.00)

TOPICS IN GERMAN FILM--Survey of selected historical, formal, and aesthetic developments in German cinema from silent films to the present, including topics such as mountain films, propaganda and feature films of the National Socialist period, and auteur films. Taught in English. May retake for credit with permission of German Studies department. Description for "'TRASHED'-DOCUMENTARY FILMS AS VISUAL NARRATIVES FROM AND ABOUT THE ANTHROPOCENE"--This course takes a critical look as to how the documentary genre communicates information about (un)sustainable practices and promotes activism in the areas of politics, public health, and energy production. The course enables students to engage with a series of German/Austrian/Swiss documentaries such as Garbage in the Garden of Eden (Akin), Our Daily Bread (Geyrhalter), Plastic Planet (Boote), and Taste the Waste (Thurm) and comparative US and other English-language documentaries. The course examines the function and effectiveness of documentaries in environmentalist discourses. Students will be able to apply their insights in presentations as well as in a team-based project that requires them to produce their own short documentary about an environmental topic with local/regional relevance. (Taught in English. German Majors/Minors will watch films and read texts in original German language and work on German-language assignments.)

Description for "ENTERTAINING THE NAZIS!? GERMAN MOVIES BETWEEN 1933 AND 1945"--National Socialist cinema usually is discussed in the context of propaganda films such as Leni Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will or Veit Harlan's Jew Süss, which support the perception that Hitler's regime exercised total economic and political control over Germany's media. There were, however, more than 1,000 feature-length films produced between 1933 and 1945, many of which do not seem to fit into the propaganda category. How are we to understand and read these films? Are they part of "Nazi Cinema," if that term is applicable? Can films be carriers of subversive messages in totalitarian societies, and if so, how do we decipher these messages? In our course we will pursue these questions by watching a number of films produced between 1933 and 1945. In addition, we will read articles and books by historians and film scholars in order to gain a better understanding of how the interpretations of these films changed from the 1940s to the 2000s.

HIS-215: African Environmental History (4.00)

This course will survey the evolution of African environmental and ecological systems over the past 200 years. Subjects will include aspects of the physical environment visible through changes in climate and hydrology, as well as key issues of human/environmental interaction, such as agriculture, deforestation, conservation, famine, malaria, and the role of colonialism and economic development in environmental change. The course will also examine the ways in which outsiders have created myths about the African environment and how Africans have managed their natural resources over time. The course will examine the causes and social effects of famine, vector-borne disease and the impact of political ecology of globalization on African environmental management. Course assignments will cover most geographical regions of Africa, but with special attention to East Africa. Materials available to students will include readings and lectures, but will also include films and other visual resources. Cross-listed as AS/ESS-215.

MAT-131: Introduction to Computer Programming (4.00)

This introduction to computer science, developed by Google and their academic computer science partners, emphasizes problem solving and data analysis skills along with computer programming skills. Using Python, you will learn design, implementation, testing, and analysis of algorithms and programs. And within the context of programming, you will learn to formulate problems, think creatively about solutions, and express those solutions clearly and accurately. Problems will be chosen from real-world examples such as graphics, image processing, cryptography, data analysis, astronomy, video games, and environmental simulation. You'll get instruction from a World-class computer science professor, delivered remotely through video and interactive media. Then you will attend class for collaborative team projects to solve real-life problems, similar to those a team at Google might face. Prior programming experience is not a requirement for this course. Cross-listed with PHY-131.

MAT-325: Mathematical Models and Applications (4.00)

Development of techniques of model building. Applications to illustrate the techniques drawn principally from the natural and social sciences. Offered alternate years.

Course requisites: 206 or 220 with a grade of C- or better

PHI-106: Bioethics (4.00)

Recent moral issues in medicine, such as euthanasia, abortion, experimentation on human and other animal subjects, justice in providing health care and in the allocation of scarce resources.

POL-125: Introduction to Human Rights (4.00)

An exploration of the theoretical and historical foundations of human rights from a multidisciplinary perspective. Presents human rights as a framework of analysis and as a moral discourse. Examines group rights-for example women, indigenous peoples, or inmates-and analyzes particularly challenging human rights problems such as genocide, torture, and immigrants' rights. Cross-listed with REL/WS-125.

POL-310: Public Policy (4.00)

Examination of the politics and processes of formulation and adoption of public policy, as well as issues of implementation and evaluation. Policy processes will be illustrated by case studies such as health care reform.

POL-313: Gender Politics (4.00)

GENDER POLITICS--An analysis of various feminist perspectives on gender, race, and class; feminist analysis of political issues; and the feminist encounter with post-modernism. Cross-listed with WS-313.

Course requisites: One 100-level POL course

POL-322: Theor of Dev & Anti-Dev (4.00)

Overview of development theory, including the modernization paradigm. Also examines criticisms of development theory and practice in the south (Latin America, Asia, and Africa), which call into question many of the tenets of modernization and work consciously to define anti development strategies. Includes examination of postcolonial social theory as well as environmental, feminist, and other social movements in the south.

Course requisites: One 100-level course

POL-329: Issues in Global Migration (4.00)

Provides a theoretical framework and empirical information needed to examine critically the structures conditioning migration and people's lived experiences of migration. Includes analysis of labor migration and development, borders and national identities, forced migration, and gender and migration.

Course requisites: POL-201 or 326; plus one 300-level POL course

PSY-101: Intro Psy: Biologicl & Cognitv (4.00)

This is one-half of a two-semester introduction to psychology. The course is about the nervous system as it pertains to behavior and cognition. Students may take 101 or 102 first and each course is independent of the other.

PSY-102: Intro Psy: Dev, Social Behav (4.00)

This is one-half of a two-semester introduction to psychology. The course will cover topics such as: social psychology, development, personality, and psychopathology. Students may take 101 or 102 first and each course is independent of the other.

PSY-202: Psychology of Sexual Behavior (4.00)

Study of psychological determinants and consequences of human sexual behavior. Attitudinal and emotional factors will be emphasized. Cross-listed with WS-202.

Course requisites: PSY-101 or PSY-102

PSY-205: Introduction to Industrial/ Organizational Psychology (4.00)

Explores how people think and behave at work from industrial/organizational perspectives. The industrial perspective examines the theory and practice of selection, training and evaluation of workers; organizational perspective investigates employee satisfaction, motivation, leadership, and cooperative processes. Cross-listed with BUS-205.

Course requisites: PSY-101 or PSY-102

PSY-207: Research Design and Methods (4.00)

Fundamentals of research design and methods, including scientific writing and presentation. Laboratories involve applications to major areas of psychology such as perception, learning, memory, and social psychology. Small group or individual experiments are designed and conducted. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: PSY-206 or permission of Psych/Neuro Dept.

PSY-312: Abnormal Psychology (4.00)

Coverage of the diagnostic characteristics, theoretical perspectives, and treatments of the major psychological disorders.

Course requisites: PSY-101 and PSY-207

SOC-101: Intro to Sociology (4.00)

Current sociological theory and research as they relate to primary units of social life, social processes, and social institutions. Emphasis on relating concepts to contemporary American society. Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101 is the prerequisite for all other courses in Sociology except 336. SOC-101 meets the Social/Cultural Analysis standard.

SOC-221: Social Problems in Global Contexts (4.00)

Examines competing definitions of and solutions to social problems. Topics vary, but may include issues related to wealth and poverty, racism, gender, work, family, education, and globalization.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

SOC-225: Urban Lives (4.00)

An exploration of social changes in urban settings in the United States, the Caribbean, and Western Europe, particularly the ways societal processes and social structures influence community and cultural life. Issues such as urban poverty, environmental pollution, "global city" formation and residential segregation will be discussed. Cross-listed with AS-225.

Course requisites: SOC-101, AS-170 or ANT-101

SOC-230: Race, Class and Gender (4.00)

Survey of the history, basic theories and recent research integrating these key concepts for modern society. Systematic examination of the effects of these variables on different groups in society. Cross-listed with WS-231/AS-230.

SPA-370: Topics in Latino Literature (4.00)

TOPICS IN LATINA/O LITERATURE--A critical analysis of a specific topic, genre, or period in Latino literature and other English Language media produced in the United States. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Many Latino authors write in English while filtering their stories through recollections of another country, the Spanish language and their respective cultures. Readings will examine how ancestry, immigration, and bi-cultural realities shape the identity and perspective of Latinos the communities and generations in the U.S. Cross-listed with ENG-370A/WS-370 when the topic applies.

Description for "LATINA LITERATURE"--This course focuses on the writing of women who self-identify as Mexican, Cuban or Puerto Rican-American. Within this body of literature the course will be dedicated to examining how Latinas handle illness, healing and reproductive issues through a cultural prism different from that of dominant Anglo society.

Course requisites: ENG-110

PH-370: Public Health Internship (4.00)

Academic component of supervised field experience in Public Health. Students attend a weekly seminar to discuss readings linking research and practice, complete an independent project that builds on the internship, and develop presentations of their work. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section for more information. Permission required.

PH-450: Credit Internship (1.00)

For juniors and seniors who want a more-focused academic component to accompany their internship, the independently designed 450 may be an option. Students must identify a faculty sponsor and complete detailed paperwork for approval from the Office of Internship and Career Development.

Requirements for the Public Health Minor

Minimum of seven courses including four core courses and three electives.  At least one elective must focus on health, medicine, or disease (Group B). At least one elective must be at 300-level or above

Group A: Core Courses

PH-101: Survey of Public Health (4.00)

Survey course that introduces the subdisciplines of public health. Introduces epidemiological, environmental, occupational, cultural, behavioral, and policy issues relevant to the health of populations around the world. Includes a historical context for current health issues and global practices.

PH-210: Biostatistics (4.00)

Basic principles of statistics and their application in a public health context. Topics include generating hypotheses, analyzing data and interpreting results, and communicating findings to scientific and non-scientific audiences.

Course requisites: PH-101

PH-211: Principles of Epidemiology (4.00)

Analysis of the distribution, determinants, and prevention of disease, disability and premature death in populations. Includes quantitative analysis of the biological, social, economic, and environmental conditions that affect health, as well as an examination of potential bias in studies.

Course requisites: PH-101 & Statistics (PH-210, MAT-115 or PSY-206)

PH-311: Global Health (4.00)

Continues from introduction to public health and epidemiology to infectious and chronic disease in terms of global prevalence. Case studies, theory, and methods about health from a multidisciplinary perspective. The relation of biological, economic, political, cultural, and behavior factors to disease spread and management.

Course requisites: PH-101 and PH-211 required prerequisites.

Group B: Health, Medicine or Disease

Choose at least one.

PH-202: Environ and Public Health Communication (4.00)

Examines and develops communication practices associated with current issues and controversies. Focus on communication as related to public and environmental health, especially as directed to target populations and advocacy. Final project related to a student's academic interest. Cross-listed with ESS-202.

Course requisites: Take ENG-110;

PH-225: Topics in Women's Health (4.00)

This course will examine women's health issues from scientific and sociopolitical perspectives. Cross-listed with WS-225.

PH-226: Maternal and Reproductive Health (4.00)

This course employs a liberal arts approach, introducing multiple disciplinary perspectives on maternal and reproductive health topics, including pregnancy and childbirth, family planning, infertility and reproductive technologies. It will foster increased understanding of socio-cultural, biological, economic, environmental and historical influences on health, and encourage students to think critically about technical, financial, ethical and gendered aspects of intervention strategies. The course employs a case study approach; students will discuss real-life examples of maternal and reproductive health interventions, policies and ethical dilemmas. Cross-listed with WS-226.

PH-240: Medical Anthropology (4.00)

This course provides an introduction to medical anthropology, incorporating both cultural and biological approaches to the subfield. The course will examine the variation of experience, meaning, and response to human health and illness across cultures. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of theoretical concepts in medical anthropology to public health and development work. Cross-listed with ANT-240.

Course requisites: Take ANT-101 PH-101 or SOC-101

PH-330: Social & Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (4.00)

This course covers select behavioral and social science theories in their application to public health research and practice. Includes an introduction to and critical analysis of selected social and behavioral science theories and methods, and considers their application to improve population health in ways that are appropriate for the context.

Course requisites: PH-211

PH-331: Environmental Health (4.00)

An interdisciplinary, scientific survey of human interactions with the natural and built environments of the earth, and how anthropogenic stressors can ultimately influence public health and environmental quality. Physical and social environments are important determinants of the health of individuals and communities. Exposure to chemical, biological and physical agents can and do occur through the air, water and soil that comprise our physical environment. Particular emphasis in this course will be placed on describing (1) what pollution is and how/why it is harmful, (2) what the root sources and causes of pollution are, (3) what happens to pollutants when they enter the environment, and (4) how each pollutant class affects individual and community health over acute to chronic exposure periods. Cross-listed with ESS-331.

Course requisites: Take PH-101 or ESS-101 for Environmental Health topic

PH-332: Health Policy (4.00)

This course will introduce students to different models of health care delivery and finance, including universal, single-payer, privatized, and "out-of-pocket" systems. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of different health care models with attention to cost, quality, access, ethics, and human rights. They will also discuss the socio-cultural, historical, economic, and political factors that led countries to adopt different health systems, including the United States. The course addresses leadership in the field of health policy and management, in both domestic and global settings. T.R. Reid's The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper and Fairer Health Care, will be supplemented with academic analyses and policy briefs. Students will complete projects on the U.S. health care reform and at least one other international health system. This course provides an additional topical offering for PH-331, which will provide students with a choice of topic and also expands the curriculum to cover all of the major subdisciplines of public health.

Course requisites: PH-101

PH-335: Laboratory Techniques Public Health (4.00)

This laboratory course is a hands-on experimental experience investigating an original Environmental Health program utilizing two or more common instrumental techniques such as absorption and emission spectroscopies, chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Students will identify a scientific question, formulate an experimental design, and conduct experiments. Students will also gain experience on obtaining and preparing samples, analyzing and interpreting data, and drawing valid conclusions based on experimental results. Prerequisites: PH-101, CHE-220, and CHE-230. Cross-listed with CHE-335.

Course requisites: PH-211, CHE-220 and CHE-230

PH-345: Health Economics (4.00)

This course analyzes the economics of health care in the United States with a focus on health policy. Topics include obesity, smoking, and insurance. Cross-listed with ECO-345.

Course requisites: ECO-105

PH-350: Anthropology of Violence (4.00)

This course explores violence across the modern world, including political, structural, symbolic, and "everyday violence." Case studies of genocide, ethnocide, femicide, and rape will be considered through a human rights framework, with particular emphasis on reparation, rebuilding, and prevention. Cross-listed with ANT-350.

Course requisites: Take 1: ANT/PH/SOC-101 or REL/POL-125

PH-363: A History of Health & Healing in Africa (4.00)

A HISTORY OF HEALTH & HEALING IN AFRICA--Seminar on the history of disease, health and healing in Africa. In this course we consider the intersections between knowledge production, power, race, and class in African history. Cross-listed with AS/HIS-363.

PH-372: Affordable & Sustainable Healthcare Tech (4.00)

This interdisciplinary course will provide an overview of the key issues involved in the introduction of sustainable healthcare technology in resource-constrained regions. The course combines lectures on critical concepts in affordable health care technology development and implementation, including context and needs evaluation, supply chain infrastructure and usability design, financial sustainability, and the ethics of low-cost healthcare provision, with practical learning. Through close faculty mentorship, small groups of students will work in mixed-discipline teams (in partnership with Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology) to create a solution to an identified real-world health problem, such as delivering clean water or perinatal monitoring. Students will develop applications for mobile-based devices in recognition that such technologies are increasingly relied upon as a rapid route to implementing and deploying healthcare solutions (mHealth.) Organizations based in relevant resource-constrained settings will be identified which can provide feedback and detailed information important to the solutions; wherever possible, pilot implementation of student developed apps will be facilitated with local partners at the conclusion of the course. Cross-listed with ANT-372.

Course requisites: One of the following courses: PH-211, PH/ANT-240, ANT/SOC-390, or PHY/MAT-131

PH-375: Public Health Design & Evaluation (4.00)

This course guides students through the process of public health intervention design, from needs assessment to evaluation. Students work in groups mentored by the course instructor to develop and pilot research instruments and study protocols, simulating public health working environments.

Course requisites: PH-311 Global Health

PH-395: Topics in Public Health (4.00)

TOPICS IN PUBLIC HEALTH--This course will offer a rotating selection of topics in public health. Students enrolled will have a background in Public Health and will be able to explore areas of public health which might include Health Disparities, Mental Health, etc. PH-395 may be repeated if the topic changes.

Description for "GEOGRAPHIES OF HEALTH AND DISEASE"--The course explores how geographic concepts - space, place, location, movement, environment, and region -- can help us to better understand health. Students will gain the knowledge necessary to think critically about spatial processes relating to health and healthcare. Students will also have opportunities to apply socio-spatial thinking to specific issues in public health through case studies and original research. The course is highly interdisciplinary and applied. Topics include GIS, globalization, im/migration, "modernization," urbanization, (political) disease ecology, pandemic diffusion, spatial epidemiology, biometeorology, health care delivery, health resource planning, and telemedicine.

Description for "COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH PRACTICE AND RESEARCH"--This course is designed as an overview of community-based health practice and research and will familiarize students with key historical underpinnings of community-based health practice; principles of community-based participatory research; methodological considerations in building community partnerships and community coalitions; community assessment; research planning, data gathering and data sharing. The course will also address cultural competence; working with diverse populations; and ethical issues in community-based health practice and research.

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Course requisites: PH-101 and PH-211

PH-410: Directed Reading (1.00)

DIRECTED READING--Directed reading courses are offered by all academic programs and are open to qualified juniors and seniors to pursue reading outside a program's listed courses. Non-majors who demonstrate sufficient preparation in the discipline may also take 410 courses. Applications to take directed reading are available in the Office of Academic Advising and must be returned to the assistant dean of the college for approval. A 410 course carries one to four semester-hours credit. Ordinarily, a student will take no more than two semester courses of directed reading. The application should include the name of the instructor who will offer the 410, the course title,a description of the topic to be studied, a statement of the student's preparation for such study and the basis for the grade. The instructor must endorse the application, as well as the chair of the department or director of the program offering the 410. If a student wishes to take a 410 outside her major program, her application also must describe her preparation in the program offering the 410.

PH-440: Directed Research (4.00)

Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to a particular field of intellectual or artistic interest, or to non-majors who demonstrate sufficient preparation in the discipline. Applications are available in the Office of Academic Advising and must be returned to the assistant dean of the college for approval. A 440 course carries 4 semester-hours credit.

ANT-345: Anthropology of Public Health (4.00)

This course examines anthropological perspectives and practices for understanding public health and medicine. It considers a variety of health issues, discourses, knowledge, and practices among different societies and social strata within various societies. It likewise explores globalization effects on health.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

ANT-371: Women, Health and Society (4.00)

Cross-cultural concepts of women's bodies and health, including reproduction and child care, health practitioners and disease. Focus on gender, ethnic and class differences in health, health concepts and health practices around the world and locally, as well as research methods (kinship, interviews) relating to health. Cross-listed with WS-371.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

BIO-311: Disease Ecology (4.00)

Hosts, pathogens, and vectors are parts of complex ecosystems. In order to understand the impacts of disease, this course will examine the effects of disease on ecosystems (including humans) and explore the ecological and evolutionary processes that drive disease dynamics.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111 - OR - PH-101 and PH-211

BIO-317: Immunology/Lab (4.00)

Study of mammalian immune system at cellular and molecular level. Topics include: recognition of antigen, development of lymphocyte repertoire, innate and adaptive immune responses, and immune disorders such as autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & one 200-level BIO course

HIS-215: African Environmental History (4.00)

This course will survey the evolution of African environmental and ecological systems over the past 200 years. Subjects will include aspects of the physical environment visible through changes in climate and hydrology, as well as key issues of human/environmental interaction, such as agriculture, deforestation, conservation, famine, malaria, and the role of colonialism and economic development in environmental change. The course will also examine the ways in which outsiders have created myths about the African environment and how Africans have managed their natural resources over time. The course will examine the causes and social effects of famine, vector-borne disease and the impact of political ecology of globalization on African environmental management. Course assignments will cover most geographical regions of Africa, but with special attention to East Africa. Materials available to students will include readings and lectures, but will also include films and other visual resources. Cross-listed as AS/ESS-215.

PHI-106: Bioethics (4.00)

Recent moral issues in medicine, such as euthanasia, abortion, experimentation on human and other animal subjects, justice in providing health care and in the allocation of scarce resources.

PSY-202: Psychology of Sexual Behavior (4.00)

Study of psychological determinants and consequences of human sexual behavior. Attitudinal and emotional factors will be emphasized. Cross-listed with WS-202.

Course requisites: PSY-101 or PSY-102

PSY-205: Introduction to Industrial/ Organizational Psychology (4.00)

Explores how people think and behave at work from industrial/organizational perspectives. The industrial perspective examines the theory and practice of selection, training and evaluation of workers; organizational perspective investigates employee satisfaction, motivation, leadership, and cooperative processes. Cross-listed with BUS-205.

Course requisites: PSY-101 or PSY-102

PSY-312: Abnormal Psychology (4.00)

Coverage of the diagnostic characteristics, theoretical perspectives, and treatments of the major psychological disorders.

Course requisites: PSY-101 and PSY-207

SPA-370: Topics in Latino Literature (4.00)

TOPICS IN LATINA/O LITERATURE--A critical analysis of a specific topic, genre, or period in Latino literature and other English Language media produced in the United States. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Many Latino authors write in English while filtering their stories through recollections of another country, the Spanish language and their respective cultures. Readings will examine how ancestry, immigration, and bi-cultural realities shape the identity and perspective of Latinos the communities and generations in the U.S. Cross-listed with ENG-370A/WS-370 when the topic applies.

Description for "LATINA LITERATURE"--This course focuses on the writing of women who self-identify as Mexican, Cuban or Puerto Rican-American. Within this body of literature the course will be dedicated to examining how Latinas handle illness, healing and reproductive issues through a cultural prism different from that of dominant Anglo society.

Course requisites: ENG-110

PH-370: Public Health Internship (4.00)

Academic component of supervised field experience in Public Health. Students attend a weekly seminar to discuss readings linking research and practice, complete an independent project that builds on the internship, and develop presentations of their work. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section for more information. Permission required.

PHI-450: Credit Internship (1.00)

For juniors and seniors who want a more-focused academic component to accompany their internship, the independently designed 450 may be an option. Students must identify a faculty sponsor and complete detailed paperwork for approval from the Office of Internship and Career Development.

Group C: Electives

ANT-101: Cultural Anthropology (4.00)

Overview of cultural universals and cultural diversity, using comparative analysis of African, American, Asian and other cultures. Examination of the impact of contact between cultures and the contemporary condition of indigenous peoples, using case studies (ethnographies), ethnographic film and class activities.

ANT-214: Anthropology of Religion (4.00)

This course examines the nature of religious institutions, rituals, beliefs, and experiences. By drawing upon anthropological theories of religion and selected ethnographies, we seek to understand the complex interplay between the beliefs, practices, and experiences of religion(s) and the socio-cultural contexts in which they are embedded. How do religions relate to the social order? Are they reflections of it or contested sites upon which political, economic, and cultural struggles are fought? Is religion primarily a social or psychological phenomenon? What is the nature of religious rituals and what role do they play in the construction of identity? How do sex and gender inform the nature of religious experience? What are myths and symbols? In order to explore these questions, students will be asked to engage with the anthropological corpus of theoretical and ethnographic writings on religion. In addition, there will be an opportunity to apply these concepts to the students' own lived realities through field exercises that combine theoretical analysis with participant observation. Cross-listed with REL-214.

ANT-219: Transatlantic Voodoo (4.00)

Traces Voodoo/Vodun religious traditions from West Africa to the Caribbean and North America, including the history of European contact and the slave trade, European views of African religions, and the cultural and symbolic meanings of Voodoo spirits and dancing. Cross-listed with AS/REL-219.

ANT-245: Marriage, Sexuality and Power in Cross Cultural Perspective (4.00)

This course reviews marriage around the world, such as polygyny, monogamy, polyandry, and homosexual and heterosexual unions, and discusses the consequences for emotional bonds, power, sexuality, children, and financial arrangements. Cross-listed with WS-245.

ANT-301: Contemp Cult & Controversies in Lat Amer (4.00)

This course focuses on understanding the legacies of colonial and neo-colonial relationships in Latin America through exploration of current controversies and social issues. The critical reading of ethnographies from throughout the region will be central to the course.

Course requisites: ANT-101 or SOC-101

ANT-340: Worlds of Culture: Global Ethnography (4.00)

A sample of ethnographies offering detailed anthropological studies of a range of geographic regions and cultural themes. The course probes other cultures' ways of knowing and how they deal with religion, ecology, economics, kinship, gender, health, language, and globalization.

Course requisites: Anthropology 101

ANT-354: Human Culture in Anthropological Perspective (4.00)

Advanced course on anthropological understandings of culture and humanity. Students read ethnographies and theoretical works to examine different ways of understanding behavior.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

ANT-380: Culture and Ethnography of Africa (4.00)

This course offers an examination and appreciation of African cultures in the present context and in historical perspective. Course topics include kinship, gender, politics, religion, economics, and colonialism. Students read several ethnographies for an in-depth understanding of specific cultures. Cross-listed with AS/REL-380.

Course requisites: Take 1 of these classes (ANT-101, ANT/REL/AS-219, SOC-101, AS-170, HIS-257, OR AS-140/REL-217

ANT-390: Foundations of Social Research (4.00)

Introduction to social research, including developing research questions, reviewing literature, carrying out field research and data analysis. Involves teamwork. Basic skills include kinship, ethnography, interviews and surveys. Topic varies by semester. Cross-listed with SOC-390.

Course requisites: ANT-101, SOC-101 and junior standing

ANT-391: Special Areas in Social Science Inquiry (4.00)

Topics vary by semester, according to the professor teaching the course. Each student will design and carry out a research project. Required for majors. Cross-listed with SOC-391.

Course requisites: Sociology 390 or Anthropology 390

AS-170: Afr-Amer Culture & Social Institutions (4.00)

Overall framework for the study of African Americans from slavery to the present. Aspects of the African-American experience are examined from a multidisciplinary perspective.

BIO-101: Making Sense of Life: Biology for Life (4.00)

The seemingly unlikely fact that life exists and flourishes is approached through understanding the organizing principles of biological systems and the process of scientific discovery. This course aims for life-long scientific (biological) literacy, an appreciation of life in all of its forms and an understanding of our role in shaping the world for the health and well-being of ourselves and future generations.

BIO-110: Integrative Biology I (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function as they relate to ecology, evolution and genetics. Inquiry-based approaches to problem solving in science. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & BIO-110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-110L: Integrative Biology I LAB (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-110; must be taken concurrently with BIO-110.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & 110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111: Integrative Biology II (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function using one or more current problems such as addiction and cancer as a central theme. Molecular, cellular and organismal biology and the relationship of biological issues to science and society. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: Req'd prereqs: BIO-110 & 110L; req'd coreq 111L BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111L: Integrative Biology II Lab (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-111; must be taken concurrently with BIO-111.

Course requisites: BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-201: Microbiology/Lab (4.00)

Cell biology, metabolism, genetics and phylogeny of bacteria and archaea. Introduction to eukaryotic microbes and viruses. Principles of pathogenesis, immunology and environmental microbiology. Applications in biotechnology, medicine and industry. Individual laboratory project and use of representative literature in the discipline. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111

BIO-216: Molecular Biology (3.00)

Genes and their activities at the molecular level in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation in health and disease. Advanced topics in genetic engineering and biotechnology. Emphasis on experimental strategies and data analysis. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111 BIO-216 & BIO-216L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-220: Genetics/Lab (4.00)

Structure, function, regulation and transmission of hereditary materials in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and 111

BIO-260: Bioinformatics (4.00)

An introduction to the theory and practice of bioinformatics and computational biology. Topics include: the analysis of genome sequences, comparative genomics, gene expression arrays, and proteomics. As part of this course, students carry out original, independent, computer-based bioinformatics research by annotating portions of newly sequenced genomes.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & MAT-115 (or higher math course)

BIO-270: Invertebrate Biology/Lab (4.00)

Comparative anatomy, functional morphology, systematics and evolution of major and minor invertebrate phyla to achieve an understanding of unity, diversity and evolution in these animals. Laboratory includes some fieldwork. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-192 Prerequisite

BIO-350: Foundations of Neuroscience I (3.00)

This course requires students to understand the basics of the nervous system at the cellular and subcellular level as well as equip students with scientific tools such as critical analysis of primary literature, development of an inquiry based project, and presentation of scientific research. Cross-listed with PSY-350.

Course requisites: BIO-350 & BIO-350L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-350L: Inquiry Based Research Neuroscience Lab (1.00)

INQUIRY BASED RESEARCH IN NEUROSCIENCE LAB--In this laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-350, students are given background material and generate their own line of scientific inquiry with tools and specific techniques explained and taught. Based on their questions and the techniques available, they will design experiments and analyze the results.

Course requisites: BIO-350 & 350L must be taken concurrently.

BUS-202: Organizational Behavior Management (4.00)

This course will apply concepts from economics, sociology, psychology and social psychology to organizational problems that managers and employees face at work. This course is designed to teach students the elements of individual, group, and organizational influences on human behavior in organizations and the impact that behavior has on individual and firm performance. Promoting a strategic approach to organizational behavior, the course will cover a broad range of issues and challenges faced in effectively managing individuals and groups. Some of the course topics include creating an environment for success, managing diversity, leading others, motivating and rewarding individuals and groups, improving work performance, understanding work teams, making decisions, and coping with organizational life. The instructor will utilize a hybrid lecture, discussion, problem-solving/critical analysis, and experiential learning framework to address these topics.

BUS-211: Financial Accounting (4.00)

Introduction to the principles of accounting theory and the application of these principles in business and government to record business transactions and journal entries. Cross-listed with ECO-211.

Course requisites: Sophomore standing (28+ credits) or instructor's permission.

BUS-212: Managerial Accounting (4.00)

Builds on concepts developed in 211. Concentration is on the development and use of accounting information within the organization to make managerial decisions.

Course requisites: BUS-211 or ECO-211

BUS-240: Business and Society (4.00)

Investigates business' social and ethical responsibilities to both external and internal stakeholder groups. Topics include personal and organizational ethics, business' relations with government, consumers, the environment, and the community; and employee rights, employment discrimination, and affirmative action.

BUS-320: Nonprofit Organizations (4.00)

An introduction to nonprofit organizations. Topics will include the history of the nonprofit sector and its place in society, the formation and governance of nonprofit organizations, fundraising and philanthropy, and social enterprise.

CHE-150: Introduction to Chemistry (3.00)

This course delves into the world of atoms and molecules in order to study the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. The course will provide an introduction to the field of chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, acids and bases, enthalpy, and equilibrium. In addition, contemporary problems and applications of these topics may be explored. Examples may include atomic and molecular structure relevant to the design of new material such as memory metals; stoichiometry as a means of achieving green chemistry; acids and bases in the context of biochemical and environmental reactions; enthalpy in the context of energy generating fuels; and equilibrium and its role in energy storing batteries.

Course requisites: Take CHE-150L

CHE-240: Organic Chemistry I (3.00)

The systematic study of the chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on theories of structure and reactivity. Specific topics include basic organic molecular structure and bonding, isomerism, stereochemistry, molecular energetics, substitution and elimination reactions, and reactions of biologically relevant functional groups.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240L

CHE-270: Foundation Inorganic & Bioinorganic Chem (2.00)

This foundation course in inorganic chemistry examines the behavior of the elements in an effort to identify and explain patterns on the periodic table. The course focuses on the approximately 28 elements with known roles in biochemical systems including iron, copper, zinc, Na+/K+ , Mg+2, and Ca+2. Topics include the toxicity of environmental pollutants and the often surprising toxicity of nutritionally required elements such as iron and copper. Recent discoveries and case studies are used to explain biochemical selectivity in a wide variety of systems; plant, animal and archaea.

Course requisites: CHE-220 CHE-220L;

CHE-300: Introduction to Biochemistry/Lab (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways and regulation of biochemical processes. Fundamental biochemical laboratory techniques including spectroscopy, enzymology, chromatographic separations, and protein detection methods. Cross-listed with BIO-300.

Course requisites: CHE-240 & 240L (BIO-110/L & 111/L also prereqs for BIO mjrs)

CHE-350: Medicinal Organic Chemistry (4.00)

Drug discovery and development is the study of how biological targets for new drugs are selected, and how appropriate drugs for those targets are identified and brought to market. It is an interdisciplinary subject that draws from biology, chemistry and biochemistry to help us understand the interaction of a drug with a biological target, how the drug reaches its target in the body, and how it is eliminated once its function is achieved. Since a biologically active drug results from many years of experimental work in drug design and development, structure-activity relationships and drug structure optimization are topics also discussed in this course.

Course requisites: CHE-240 and 240L

ECO-104: Introduction to Macroeconomics (4.00)

Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105: Introduction to Microeconomics (4.00)

Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scarce resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

ECO-330: Poverty, Inequality & Discrimination (4.00)

This seminar examines selected topics on poverty, inequality and discrimination. Topics include the measurement, extent and causes of poverty in the U.S. and around the world; race and sex discrimination in the workplace; and changes in the distribution of income and wealth. Special attention is focused on policy issues including affirmative action, the minimum wage and welfare reform.

Course requisites: ECO-105 and 1 statistics course

ESS-101: Intro. to Environmental and Sustain Sustainability Studies (4.00)

Causes and effects of human incursion into natural systems. Examination of social, political, ethical and economic issues and theory in light of ecological and evolutionary principles, with a goal of developing sustainable programs.

ESS-395: Topics in Global Environmentl Challenges (4.00)

TOPICS IN GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES--Advanced topics in Environmental and Sustainability Studies, emphasizing the global aspects of such issues as population growth, availability of affordable clean water, food sources and distribution, loss of biodiversity, energy production and consumption, pollution, and climate change. May be repeated when topic changes and prerequisite/s vary. Description for "THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE"--Humans' impact on the environment has become so significant that some scientists have proposed renaming our current geological period the Anthropocene, since anthropos- is Greek for human. This course uses a feminist lens to survey environmental issues around the globe, including food scarcity, climate change, and industrial pollution and the efforts being made to counteract these problems. Description for "FOOD PRODUCTION"--An examination of our current systems of food production including large scale agribusiness, small farmers, organic farming and the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers; economic issues such as processing, shipping, and marketing of food; as well as the health and sustainability of humans, animals and the natural environment.

Course requisites: ESS-101 or PH-101

GER-330: Topics in German Film (4.00)

TOPICS IN GERMAN FILM--Survey of selected historical, formal, and aesthetic developments in German cinema from silent films to the present, including topics such as mountain films, propaganda and feature films of the National Socialist period, and auteur films. Taught in English. May retake for credit with permission of German Studies department. Description for "'TRASHED'-DOCUMENTARY FILMS AS VISUAL NARRATIVES FROM AND ABOUT THE ANTHROPOCENE"--This course takes a critical look as to how the documentary genre communicates information about (un)sustainable practices and promotes activism in the areas of politics, public health, and energy production. The course enables students to engage with a series of German/Austrian/Swiss documentaries such as Garbage in the Garden of Eden (Akin), Our Daily Bread (Geyrhalter), Plastic Planet (Boote), and Taste the Waste (Thurm) and comparative US and other English-language documentaries. The course examines the function and effectiveness of documentaries in environmentalist discourses. Students will be able to apply their insights in presentations as well as in a team-based project that requires them to produce their own short documentary about an environmental topic with local/regional relevance. (Taught in English. German Majors/Minors will watch films and read texts in original German language and work on German-language assignments.)

Description for "ENTERTAINING THE NAZIS!? GERMAN MOVIES BETWEEN 1933 AND 1945"--National Socialist cinema usually is discussed in the context of propaganda films such as Leni Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will or Veit Harlan's Jew Süss, which support the perception that Hitler's regime exercised total economic and political control over Germany's media. There were, however, more than 1,000 feature-length films produced between 1933 and 1945, many of which do not seem to fit into the propaganda category. How are we to understand and read these films? Are they part of "Nazi Cinema," if that term is applicable? Can films be carriers of subversive messages in totalitarian societies, and if so, how do we decipher these messages? In our course we will pursue these questions by watching a number of films produced between 1933 and 1945. In addition, we will read articles and books by historians and film scholars in order to gain a better understanding of how the interpretations of these films changed from the 1940s to the 2000s.

MAT-131: Introduction to Computer Programming (4.00)

This introduction to computer science, developed by Google and their academic computer science partners, emphasizes problem solving and data analysis skills along with computer programming skills. Using Python, you will learn design, implementation, testing, and analysis of algorithms and programs. And within the context of programming, you will learn to formulate problems, think creatively about solutions, and express those solutions clearly and accurately. Problems will be chosen from real-world examples such as graphics, image processing, cryptography, data analysis, astronomy, video games, and environmental simulation. You'll get instruction from a World-class computer science professor, delivered remotely through video and interactive media. Then you will attend class for collaborative team projects to solve real-life problems, similar to those a team at Google might face. Prior programming experience is not a requirement for this course. Cross-listed with PHY-131.

MAT-325: Mathematical Models and Applications (4.00)

Development of techniques of model building. Applications to illustrate the techniques drawn principally from the natural and social sciences. Offered alternate years.

Course requisites: 206 or 220 with a grade of C- or better

POL-125: Introduction to Human Rights (4.00)

An exploration of the theoretical and historical foundations of human rights from a multidisciplinary perspective. Presents human rights as a framework of analysis and as a moral discourse. Examines group rights-for example women, indigenous peoples, or inmates-and analyzes particularly challenging human rights problems such as genocide, torture, and immigrants' rights. Cross-listed with REL/WS-125.

POL-310: Public Policy (4.00)

Examination of the politics and processes of formulation and adoption of public policy, as well as issues of implementation and evaluation. Policy processes will be illustrated by case studies such as health care reform.

POL-313: Gender Politics (4.00)

GENDER POLITICS--An analysis of various feminist perspectives on gender, race, and class; feminist analysis of political issues; and the feminist encounter with post-modernism. Cross-listed with WS-313.

Course requisites: One 100-level POL course

POL-322: Theor of Dev & Anti-Dev (4.00)

Overview of development theory, including the modernization paradigm. Also examines criticisms of development theory and practice in the south (Latin America, Asia, and Africa), which call into question many of the tenets of modernization and work consciously to define anti development strategies. Includes examination of postcolonial social theory as well as environmental, feminist, and other social movements in the south.

Course requisites: One 100-level course

POL-329: Issues in Global Migration (4.00)

Provides a theoretical framework and empirical information needed to examine critically the structures conditioning migration and people's lived experiences of migration. Includes analysis of labor migration and development, borders and national identities, forced migration, and gender and migration.

Course requisites: POL-201 or 326; plus one 300-level POL course

PSY-101: Intro Psy: Biologicl & Cognitv (4.00)

This is one-half of a two-semester introduction to psychology. The course is about the nervous system as it pertains to behavior and cognition. Students may take 101 or 102 first and each course is independent of the other.

PSY-102: Intro Psy: Dev, Social Behav (4.00)

This is one-half of a two-semester introduction to psychology. The course will cover topics such as: social psychology, development, personality, and psychopathology. Students may take 101 or 102 first and each course is independent of the other.

PSY-207: Research Design and Methods (4.00)

Fundamentals of research design and methods, including scientific writing and presentation. Laboratories involve applications to major areas of psychology such as perception, learning, memory, and social psychology. Small group or individual experiments are designed and conducted. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: PSY-206 or permission of Psych/Neuro Dept.

SOC-101: Intro to Sociology (4.00)

Current sociological theory and research as they relate to primary units of social life, social processes, and social institutions. Emphasis on relating concepts to contemporary American society. Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101 is the prerequisite for all other courses in Sociology except 336. SOC-101 meets the Social/Cultural Analysis standard.

SOC-221: Social Problems in Global Contexts (4.00)

Examines competing definitions of and solutions to social problems. Topics vary, but may include issues related to wealth and poverty, racism, gender, work, family, education, and globalization.

Course requisites: Sociology 101 or Anthropology 101

SOC-225: Urban Lives (4.00)

An exploration of social changes in urban settings in the United States, the Caribbean, and Western Europe, particularly the ways societal processes and social structures influence community and cultural life. Issues such as urban poverty, environmental pollution, "global city" formation and residential segregation will be discussed. Cross-listed with AS-225.

Course requisites: SOC-101, AS-170 or ANT-101

SOC-230: Race, Class and Gender (4.00)

Survey of the history, basic theories and recent research integrating these key concepts for modern society. Systematic examination of the effects of these variables on different groups in society. Cross-listed with WS-231/AS-230.

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