Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the International Relations Major

A minimum of 11 courses.

Required Introductory Course

POL-103: Intro to World Politics (4.00)

INTRODUCTION TO WORLD POLITICS--Major developments in world politics since 1945; the Cold War, international political economy, challenges to state sovereignty, and environmental issues.

Required Foundational Courses

POL-226: Approaches to Pol Sci & Intl Relations (4.00)

This course will introduce students who plan to major in political science or international relations to the core competing theoretical approaches needed for upper-level study in the two disciplines. Students will also be exposed to basic methods of research in political science and international relations and to workshops on the art of reading, writing, and presenting one's work.

Course requisites: One POL course at 100 or 200 level

ECO-104: Introduction to Macroeconomics (4.00)

Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105: Introduction to Microeconomics (4.00)

Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scarce resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

Comparative/Regional History Course

One 300-level course selected from the following:

HIS-308: Minorities in the Arab World (4.00)

This class aims to critically examine the history of minorities in the making of the modern Middle East. It traces the shift from an ethnically and religiously diverse Ottoman Empire to a system of nation-states defined by ethnic or religious exclusivity. The course opens with a discussion of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of diversity in the modern Middle East. The first half of the course will cover topics that examine the Ottoman millet system, the emergence of modern notions of citizenship and sectarianism in the nineteenth century, the Armenian genocide and the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the role of colonialism in the politicization of ethnic and religious groups in the post-Ottoman period, as well as the role of minorities in identity politics and the formation of unifying ideologies. The second half of the course will examine the role of minorities in the states of Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, and Iraq. Finally, the course will end with a discussion of the rise of the Islamic State and the future role of minorities in today's Middle East. Cross-listed with REL-309.

HIS-310: People on the Move: Migration/ & Displacement in the Middle East (4.00)

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: MIGRATION & DISPLACEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST--The current Syrian "refugee crisis" has turned the world's attention to the questions of migration and displacement. This course traces the historical trajectory of these topics by considering the history of the modern Middle East through the theme of mobility and migration. It charts the transformation of migration patterns as the Middle East moved from a system of empires to a system of nation-states. Specific topics include but are not limited to: the population policies of the Ottoman Empire at its inception, population movement during the Russo-Turkish wars of the nineteenth century, Syrian migration to the Americas, ethnic cleansing, forced displacement, and population transfers during and after World War I, Jewish emigration and immigration during the twentieth century, passport regimes during the interwar period, labor migration in the Gulf, as well as the current refugee crisis.

HIS-312: Russia and the Soviet Union in the Twentieth Century (4.00)

Revolution, ethnicity, reform, stagnation and disintegration in Russian and Soviet politics, culture, economy and society from 1905 to the present.

HIS-313: Europe in the Era of the World Wars (4.00)

World War I, Nazism, the interwar years, World War II, and the Holocaust, with emphasis on ideology, culture, and diplomacy.

HIS-314: Europe From the Cold War to the European Union (4.00)

Society, economy, culture and foreign affairs in Western and Eastern Europe, since the end of World War II, with emphasis on European division and unity, the welfare state, immigration and diversity, as well as relations with the United States.

HIS-352: The Chinese Revolutions (4.00)

A study of the complex sociopolitical crises of modern China, including an evaluation of the revolutions and their impacts on recent Chinese history; particular focus on the Republican Revolution of 1911, the Communist Revolution of 1949 and the Cultural Revolution.

HIS-360: World War II in Asia on Film (4.00)

This course explores the history of World War II in Asia, especially as (re)presented and remembered in films. Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural aspects of World War II and to how films shape the collective memory of different Asian countries and the United States.

Required International Relations Theory Course

POL-326: Approaches to Intl Relations (4.00)

APPROACHES TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS--Analysis of current theoretical approaches to international relations, including realism, international regimes, and world order theory; particular focus on their utility in understanding issues such as violence, environmental politics, and North-South divisions.

Course requisites: POL-226 or any 100-level Pollitics course

Required Senior Capstone Course

One of the following courses:

IR-400: Senior Seminar in International Relations (4.00)

Required seminar for international relations seniors that allows for independent research on a topic of current interest and importance in international relations. It provides opportunities for majors to integrate the theoretical, historical and geographical components of the major through readings, discussion, research, and writing on the topic of their choosing. Cross-listed with POL-400.

Course requisites: POL-103, 226 & 326

POL-455: Seminar in Political Change (4.00)

Survey of theories and strategies of political change, using case studies of failed and successful movements for reform, revolution, and resistance to analyze the potential for new directions in contemporary politics.

Course requisites: POL-226 or 326 and 1 300-level POL course

POL-492: Seminar in Culture and Politics (4.00)

Takes up topics on the intersections between politics and culture such as the media and foreign policy, consumerism and politics, and war and popular culture, from Vietnam to Iraq.

Course requisites: POL-201 or 226 plus one 300-level POL course

Student-selected International Themes

In addition to the courses described above, students should select three courses (two of which must be taken at the 300 level or above) to be taken from one of the following thematic groups.

International Economics and Development

ECO-334: Economic Development (4.00)

Historical patterns and contemporary theories of economic development are used to clarify major issues such as the distribution of income, stabilization policy and problems of trade and finance.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

ECO-351: International Trade (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international trade. We will discuss various trade models, the welfare and distributional effects of free trade among countries, trade policy instruments, reasons for limiting trade, and economic integration.

Course requisites: Take ECO-101 or ECO-105;

ECO-352: International Finance (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international finance. We will discuss the balance of payments, functioning of foreign exchange markets, automatic and policy adjustments in the balance of payments, coordination of national economic policies, and international monetary system.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or ECO-104

ECO-353: International Economic Institutions (4.00)

This course will discuss the role of international economic institutions in promoting trade, development and financial stability in the global economy. It will focus on three main institutions: the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

POL-322: Theor of Dev & Anti-Dev (4.00)

Overview of development theory, including the modernization paradigm. Also examines criticisms of development theory and practice in the south (Latin America, Asia, and Africa), which call into question many of the tenets of modernization and work consciously to define anti development strategies. Includes examination of postcolonial social theory as well as environmental, feminist, and other social movements in the south.

Course requisites: One 100-level course

POL-395: Topics in Political Science (4.00)

TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. Critical examination of a specific topic in Political Science. Topics vary from year to year, and the course may be repeated for credit when the content changes.

Description for topic "MEDIA AND GOVERNING THROUGH CONSPIRACY, SCANDAL AND INVESTIGATION"--U.S. politics is awash in divisive partisanship and constant scandal, with the public sphere poisoned by rancor and incivility. Why? This course grapples with theoretical approaches designed to explain the current crisis, with possible topics ranging from new media, authoritarian populism, and other general trends, to politicized news channels, polarized partisanship, and more specific manifestations. The temporal focus is the post-Cold War era.

Course requisites: At least one 100-level Political Science course

Global Gender Issues

HIS-220: European Women Since the Middle Ages (4.00)

Experiences of and ideas about European women in the public and private spheres from the late Middle Ages through the 20th century. Cross-listed with WS-220.

HIS-307: Women and Gender in the Middle East (4.00)

This course is an overview of themes related to gender and women throughout the history of the Middle East, from the rise of Islam to the present. The course will cover the place and role of gender relations and women in religion, state, and society. Specific topics include the place of women in Islamic foundational texts, the shaping of gender relations in early Islamic society and jurisprudence, the role of women and family in Islamic empires, as well as the effect of imperialism on families and societies of the Middle East. Starting with the nineteenth century, we will explore the question of gender through the themes of migration, modernization, nationalism, sexuality, feminism, state formation, decolonization, the rise of political Islam, the "global war on terror", and finally the Arab Uprisings. Cross-listed with WS-307.

HIS-354: Chinese Women on Film: History and the Cinematic Imagination (4.00)

This course examines the history of women and gender in China as depicted in film. Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which modernization, imperialism, and globalization have shaped women's roles and representations of women throughout the 20th century. Cross-listed with WS-354.

HIS-359: Topics in African & Afr Diaspora History (4.00)

Critical examination of a specific topic in African history or the history of the African Diaspora. Topics vary from year to year, and the course may be repeated for credit when the content changes. Cross-listed with WS/AS-359.

POL-222: Human Rights in Muslim Contexts (4.00)

Is Islam compatible with human rights? We will analyze various debates surrounding this issue, exploring key actors and factors in state-society relations, conceptualizations of Middle Eastern politics, Muslim culture, and human rights. The course will present various debates on key rights issues, including minority and women's rights, and explore the impact of transnational activist networks on domestic human rights concerns. Cross-listed with WS-222.

POL-313: Gender Politics (4.00)

GENDER POLITICS--An analysis of various feminist perspectives on gender, race, and class; feminist analysis of political issues; and the feminist encounter with post-modernism. Cross-listed with WS-313.

Course requisites: One 100-level POL course

POL-333: Women and the Politics of Social Change In Muslim Contexts (4.00)

The course examines the increasingly visible role played by women in political, religious, and social movements in Muslim contexts, focusing on diverse forms of activism and organization. We will analyze social movement theory and debates about the (in)compatibility between rights/gender equality and Islam as well as specific issues such as family rights, violence against women, religious expression, and women's political representation. Cross-listed with WS-333.

POL-365: Dissent & Protest in Muslim Contexts In Muslim Contexts (4.00)

People all across the Muslim world are challenging authorities and seeking social and political change. This course examines contentious politics, in the form of protest, dissent, and social movements that arise in Muslim contexts. While the first part of the course introduces students to key concepts of social movement theory and contentious politics as developed by political sociologists and comparativists, the latter weeks of the course will analyze case studies mostly from the region commonly known as the Middle East and North Africa (MENA.) Together we will examine the factors that lead to contentious politics with an emphasis on structural constraints and opportunities for social and political activism in authoritarian and semi-democratic contexts. We will analyze why some forms of contentious politics lead to social movement development, as in feminist, environmentalist, and religious political movements in many Muslim contexts, while others such as some of the recent pro-democratic uprisings fail in delivering lasting political and electoral change. We will also explore the relation between Islamic activism and social movements, by looking at some the different ways groups have used Islam to mobilize support and as a blueprint for social and political transformation, and examine some of the reasons why some movements use violence. Cross-listed with WS-365.

REL-251: Gender, Sexuality & Islam (4.00)

Gender and sexuality are crucial to understanding the political, social, and economic life in the world today. Gender and sexuality studies challenge a number of traditional, academic, and cultural perspectives. In this course, we will be using critical texts from a wide variety of disciplines to examine gender and sexuality in the Muslim context. Using gender and sexuality as our main lens of analysis, we will be able to tease out the complex relationships between religion and culture and think about how particular constructions of culture have been pivotal to the reproduction of each of these social structures. In the final section of the course, we will look at transnational discourses that shape the way in which Islam and "the woman question" is imagined in relationship to gender and sexuality. We will also learn about Orientalism, colonialism, and the role of global inequalities. Cross-listed with WS-251.

SOC-356: Comparative Black Feminisms (4.00)

Interdisciplinary analysis and critique of the history of ideas which make up African and African Diasporic feminist thought and practice. Cross-listed with AS/WS-356.

Course requisites: ANT-101, SOC-101 or WS-100

WS-245: Marriage, Sexuality and Power in Cross Cultural Perspective (4.00)

This course reviews marriage around the world, such as polygyny, monogamy, polyandry, and homosexual and heterosexual unions, and discusses the consequences for emotional bonds, power, sexuality, children, and financial arrangements. Cross-listed with ANT-245.

WS-334: Sex, Gender and Embodiment in Buddhism (4.00)

This course examines the various ways that different Buddhist societies have struggled with the tension between the religion's transcendent goal of enlightenment and the this-worldly challenges of human sexuality, embodiment, and gender. Cross-listed with REL-334.

Course requisites: Take ONE from REL-113 REL-130 REL-133 REL-195 or REL-232 or permission of instructor.

WS-352: Global Feminisms (4.00)

This interdisciplinary course explores global/transnational feminist issues as individual and collective practices and as organized movements. Cross-listed with POL-352.

Course requisites: WS-100, WS/POL/REL-125 or WS/POL-222 (or permission)

Middle-Eastern Studies

HIS-107: The Making of the Modern Middle East (4.00)

This course is an introduction to the study of the modern Middle East that covers events and themes from the eighteenth century until the present day. The goal of the course is to introduce the major topics, events, movements, and ideas that shaped the Middle East. Such topics will include but are not limited to: the integration of the Middle East into the world economy; the advent of imperialism and colonialism; the reforms of the nineteenth century; the transition from empires to nation-states; the World Wars and state formation; the rise of nationalisms and the consolidation of the state; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the role of the United States in the Middle East; and finally the most recent Arab uprisings.

HIS-207: The Global Middle East (4.00)

The proliferation of commodities, ideas, and peoples throughout the globe during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has led to the rise of global studies. This course explores themes in the modern Middle East in light of this "global" turn. The first three weeks will provide a theoretical background on the questions that inform the course. The discussion will start with an overview of the study of nationalism in the Middle East. It will then proceed to a discussion of approaches to that question using the "national" as a lens to study the history of the modern Middle East. Students will learn about such concepts as "transnationalism," "internationalism," and "globalization." The rest of the course will then explore various themes from the late nineteenth century to the present. This includes: the rise of the world economy, imperialism, the first wave of globalization, World War I and internationalism, diasporas and transnationalism, the global Cold War, oil, the "Global War on Terror." Finally, students will also be asked to think about the recent Arab uprisings and the merits of using transnationalism as a point of inquiry in the history of the Middle East.

HIS-307: Women and Gender in the Middle East (4.00)

This course is an overview of themes related to gender and women throughout the history of the Middle East, from the rise of Islam to the present. The course will cover the place and role of gender relations and women in religion, state, and society. Specific topics include the place of women in Islamic foundational texts, the shaping of gender relations in early Islamic society and jurisprudence, the role of women and family in Islamic empires, as well as the effect of imperialism on families and societies of the Middle East. Starting with the nineteenth century, we will explore the question of gender through the themes of migration, modernization, nationalism, sexuality, feminism, state formation, decolonization, the rise of political Islam, the "global war on terror", and finally the Arab Uprisings. Cross-listed with WS-307.

HIS-308: Minorities in the Arab World (4.00)

This class aims to critically examine the history of minorities in the making of the modern Middle East. It traces the shift from an ethnically and religiously diverse Ottoman Empire to a system of nation-states defined by ethnic or religious exclusivity. The course opens with a discussion of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of diversity in the modern Middle East. The first half of the course will cover topics that examine the Ottoman millet system, the emergence of modern notions of citizenship and sectarianism in the nineteenth century, the Armenian genocide and the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the role of colonialism in the politicization of ethnic and religious groups in the post-Ottoman period, as well as the role of minorities in identity politics and the formation of unifying ideologies. The second half of the course will examine the role of minorities in the states of Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, and Iraq. Finally, the course will end with a discussion of the rise of the Islamic State and the future role of minorities in today's Middle East. Cross-listed with REL-309.

HIS-310: People on the Move: Migration/ & Displacement in the Middle East (4.00)

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: MIGRATION & DISPLACEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST--The current Syrian "refugee crisis" has turned the world's attention to the questions of migration and displacement. This course traces the historical trajectory of these topics by considering the history of the modern Middle East through the theme of mobility and migration. It charts the transformation of migration patterns as the Middle East moved from a system of empires to a system of nation-states. Specific topics include but are not limited to: the population policies of the Ottoman Empire at its inception, population movement during the Russo-Turkish wars of the nineteenth century, Syrian migration to the Americas, ethnic cleansing, forced displacement, and population transfers during and after World War I, Jewish emigration and immigration during the twentieth century, passport regimes during the interwar period, labor migration in the Gulf, as well as the current refugee crisis.

REL-251: Gender, Sexuality & Islam (4.00)

Gender and sexuality are crucial to understanding the political, social, and economic life in the world today. Gender and sexuality studies challenge a number of traditional, academic, and cultural perspectives. In this course, we will be using critical texts from a wide variety of disciplines to examine gender and sexuality in the Muslim context. Using gender and sexuality as our main lens of analysis, we will be able to tease out the complex relationships between religion and culture and think about how particular constructions of culture have been pivotal to the reproduction of each of these social structures. In the final section of the course, we will look at transnational discourses that shape the way in which Islam and "the woman question" is imagined in relationship to gender and sexuality. We will also learn about Orientalism, colonialism, and the role of global inequalities. Cross-listed with WS-251.

REL-252: Islam and/In the West (4.00)

This course examines the interaction between Islamic and Western civilizations during the past fourteen hundred years. The first part of the course is devoted to the analysis of key terms and concepts that will serve as the foundation for the remaining parts of the course. Different concepts such as Islam, Shari'a, the nation state, free speech, rationality, democracy, and secularism will be discussed in their historical contexts. The second part of the course is structured chronologically and covers from the Middle Ages through the nineteenth century. In the final part of the course, we will survey the history of Islam in the West, with a focus on the U.S. and France, and examine case studies to discuss contemporary questions on political Islam, civilizational clash, and the future of coexistence.

REL-372: Fiction, Film and Orientalism (4.00)

Orientalism, as defined by Edward Said, is the ideology that promotes the "West-and-non-West" dichotomy and the idea that "Others are less human." Neo-Orientalism is savvier, and has a more complex and dualist nature, not all that is read or seen is neo-Orientalism narratives is wrong and pejorative, and most significantly, it is written not by outsiders about "the other" like in Orientalism, but by "authentic" insiders. Both narratives serve largely the same purpose, which is to dominate and subordinate both politically and intellectually the non-West. In this course, books and movies that have become bestsellers in the West will be analyzed for Orientalism and neo-Orientalism.

POL-222: Human Rights in Muslim Contexts (4.00)

Is Islam compatible with human rights? We will analyze various debates surrounding this issue, exploring key actors and factors in state-society relations, conceptualizations of Middle Eastern politics, Muslim culture, and human rights. The course will present various debates on key rights issues, including minority and women's rights, and explore the impact of transnational activist networks on domestic human rights concerns. Cross-listed with WS-222.

POL-333: Women and the Politics of Social Change In Muslim Contexts (4.00)

The course examines the increasingly visible role played by women in political, religious, and social movements in Muslim contexts, focusing on diverse forms of activism and organization. We will analyze social movement theory and debates about the (in)compatibility between rights/gender equality and Islam as well as specific issues such as family rights, violence against women, religious expression, and women's political representation. Cross-listed with WS-333.

Post-Colonial Studies

ENG-215: Literature of Ireland (4.00)

As a site of constant invasion and as "England's first colony and her last," Ireland has engaged in the struggle for national and cultural identity in its literature from the earliest texts (myths, monastic and bardic poetry, ballads) to the satirical works of Jonathan Swift, the Celtic Revival led by Yeats and Gregory, the Gaelic language movement, the postcolonial subjects and arguments of Irish modernism, representations of The Troubles, and the cross-border, cross-boundary perspectives of contemporary literature. We will explore these and related themes in works by Swift, Edgeworth, Synge, Yeats, Gregory, O'Crohan, O'Casey, Kavanagh, Macneice, Deane, Friel, Heaney, Boland, Carr, and others.

Course requisites: Prereq ENG-110

ENG-217: Topics in Literature and Empire (4.00)

TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND EMPIRE: Exploration of themes of colonization and imperialism across periods and genres (for example, The Adventure Novel, Narratives of the Empire, and Orientalist Texts and Contexts) focusing on cultural and social anxieties generated by the imperial project, the dynamics of domination and exploitation, the nature of constructed identities, and the dialectic of gender roles and relationships. Cross-listed with WS-317.

Description for "NARRATIVES OF EMPIRE: EXPLORERS, ADVENTURERS, CHARLATANS, COLONIZERS"--Thieves and adventurers, pirates of the high seas and unscrupulous deceivers, wise old men, resourceful teenagers, horse-traders, spies; women, clever, witty, perspicacious; natives, sharp, skillful, and accomplished--a thrilling journey through the British Empire in the process of its formation, from the South Seas and Polynesia to Afghanistan and central India, from North Africa to the Belgian Congo, and the Sudan to southern Africa. Will explore dynamics of domination and exploitation, nature of constructed identities, the dialectic of gender roles and relationships. Texts may include works by Henty, Marrayat, Stevenson, Haggard, Schreiner, Kipling, Conrad, and Forster, among others, as well as films and documentaries.

Course requisites: 110

ENG-317: Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature (4.00)

STUDIES IN RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE--Thematic, generic or period studies (for example: The Colonial Imagination or Forms of Fiction). Cross-listed with WS-317

Description for "THE COLONIAL IMAGINATION"--A study of how fiction, drama, letters, poetry, and nonfiction of the late seventeenth- and eighteenth-centuries represent English encounters with other peoples and cultures. We will explore how these representations are themselves part of the colonial project, reinforcing English domination and exploitation; how factors such as gender and class complicate our understanding of colonial situations, and how colonized peoples co-opt and subvert elements of English culture in their own literature. Authors include Behn, Defoe, Swift, Equiano.

Course requisites: 200-level English course

ENG-321: Studies in Romanticism (4.00)

STUDIES IN ROMANTICISM--Thematic, generic or period studies (for example, British Romantic Writers, Transatlantic Romanticisms, Romanticism Through the Ages, or Romanticism, Orientalism and Imperialism). Description for "BRITISH ROMANTIC POETRY/PROSE"--This course focuses on one of the most remarkable periods of creativity in English literary history that signaled the decline of old feudal structures and ushered in an era of individualism, political revolution, and democratic values. Paradoxically, it also ended up generating a sense of revolutionary elitism and notions of artistic autonomy and cultural superiority that came to represent an important feature of European, and, of course, British, imperialism. Romantic writers, in turn, were heavily influenced by the Orient and freely appropriated its texts, aesthetics, and themes even as they satirized its mores and manners. In this course we shall trace the genesis of the Romantic movement in the reaffirmation of feeling and emotion over the classical (and Enlightenment) values of reason and restraint and study the relationship of the writers and their works to nature, imagination, and folklore, as also to political and cultural changes in England and to the grand design of empire building that was in full swing at this time. Course texts may include writings by, among others, William Jones, Helen Maria Williams, Charlotte Smith, Edmund Burke, Robert Burns, Anna Barbauld, William Blake, Hannah More Robert Southey, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas Moore, Byron, the Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats.

Course requisites: 200-level literature course

ENG-352: Studies in Postcolonial Literature (4.00)

STUDIES IN POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE--Study of literature written in nations that were formerly European colonies (for example, the literature of South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand and Canada). Cross-listed with AS-352.

Description for "AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND FILM"--This course seeks to introduce students to a selection of African literature and film from a postcolonial perspective. It examines systemic structures of domination and exploitation, colonial and local, and investigates issues of race, class, tribal affiliation, identity, and gender in order to understand both the nature of the societies depicted and the motivating impulses behind the texts we study. The interdisciplinary approach will allow us to identify the residual effects of colonization as well as the intrinsic dynamics of a selected variety of postcolonial societies in Africa within a historical context. At the same time, we will look at stylistic, formal, and technical elements to analyze and appraise the aesthetic and imaginative qualities of the assigned material. Texts originally produced in English as well as those translated from local languages may be used.

Description for "MODERN SOUTH ASIAN AND MIDDLE-EASTERN LITERATURE"--A study of literature from South Asia and the Middle East from a postcolonial historical perspective. The central focus of this course is the critical examination of relationships, interactions and outcomes among and within dominant colonial and marginalized postcolonial cultures, subcultures and groups. After examining ideas about self and the other and the social and political scale of power fostered by colonial authorities, we shall turn our attention to the postcolony with the following questions: What are the regimes of differentiation and discrimination within postcolonial societies? What aspects of these hierarchies of difference are derived from colonial rule and which aspects are endemic to the postcolonial society? How do the related, though outwardly independent, historical developments of the times, the birth of modernism, the Russian revolution, and the dismantling of British colonial rule affect South Asian and Middle-Eastern societies as reflected in their literary and artistic productions? What does the term "postcolonial" signify? How do postcolonial literature and approaches to literary works seek to identify, challenge, and subvert the continuing hierarchies of domination and subservience derived from the colonial period as well as the internal orders of privileging and difference in the postcolony? What are the advantages and disadvantages of deploying this critical approach? We shall study texts originally produced in English and may also use English translations of works, written and oral, from regional languages, in order to understand the aesthetics, cultural perspectives, and ideological positions that animate these literary and artistic productions.

Description for "LITERATURE OF SOUTH ASIA, MIDDLE EAST, AND AFRICA"--Using a historical introduction to provide a background for the debates involving the postcolonial condition and the struggle for personal, cultural, and/or national autonomy in formerly colonized areas or states, we shall proceed to an overview of the field of postcolonial literary theory to establish the context for our study before looking at postcolonial literature and films from former British colonies (and areas formerly under British control) in South-Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Occasionally, translations from works in the indigenous languages may be introduced to highlight contrasts and correspondences with work originally composed in English, or give a more inclusive view of the range and nature of responses to the colonial experience in these areas. Texts to be selected from works by, among others, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Sara Suleri, Bapsi Sidhwa, Mohsin Hamid, Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Ghassan Kanafani, Furugh Farrukhzad, Mahmoud Darwish, Adonis, Sami-ul-Qasim, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugiwa Thiongo, Tayyib Salih, Ama Ata Aidoo, and Bessie Head.

FRE-243: French Fashion: Theory and Practice of Haute Couture (4.00)

FRENCH FASHION: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF HAUTE COUTURE--This course will examine France's vast cultural and economic contributions to the global fashion industry, beginning with its definitive origin at Versailles. Topics to be considered will include: the rise of the fashion designer; Paris as a global fashion capital; haute couture and the cultural imaginary; fashion and racism; the economics of "fast fashion"; and fashion in relation to the fine arts and the ethics of consumption. Practical instruction re: career possibilities in fashion will be included. Taught in English.

GER-340: The History, Literature and Culture of Afro-Germans (4.00)

THE HISTORY, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE OF AFRO-GERMANS--This course focuses on the history, literature and culture of people of African descent living in German-speaking countries and on discourses of German identity. Cross-listed with AS-340.

Description when topic is "'OTHER GERMANS' AFRICAN DIASPORA IN GERMAN-SPEAKING EUROPE". This course investigates the long and multifaceted history and culture of the African diaspora in the German-speaking countries, including the influence of African science and culture in 18th-century Germany, the German-African/African-American connections during colonialist times, African peoples' marginalisation and persecution under National Socialism, the experience of African-American soldiers as post-World-War II occupation troops, and black Germans as members of 20th/21st-century re-unified Germany. Taught in English. (German Majors/Minors will have opportunities to apply language skills by working with German-language texts/films and some writing in German.)

HIS-398: Topics in Latin American History (4.00)

TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY--Critical examination of a specific topic in the history of Latin America. Topics vary from year to year, and the course may be repeated for credit when the content changes. Meets the Humanistic Studies standard.

Description for "PYRAMIDS, PEWS AND PRAISE: THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY IN LATIN AMERICA FROM THE ENCOUNTER TO THE PRESENT"--An examination of Christianity in Latin America since the arrival of the conquistadores. Themes include: church history; social aspects and identity; the place of women, slaves, indigenous populations and other marginalized groups; deviance; the rise of Pentecostalism; liberation theology and the election of Pope Francis.

POL-329: Issues in Global Migration (4.00)

Provides a theoretical framework and empirical information needed to examine critically the structures conditioning migration and people's lived experiences of migration. Includes analysis of labor migration and development, borders and national identities, forced migration, and gender and migration.

Course requisites: POL-201 or 326; plus one 300-level POL course

POL-333: Women and the Politics of Social Change In Muslim Contexts (4.00)

The course examines the increasingly visible role played by women in political, religious, and social movements in Muslim contexts, focusing on diverse forms of activism and organization. We will analyze social movement theory and debates about the (in)compatibility between rights/gender equality and Islam as well as specific issues such as family rights, violence against women, religious expression, and women's political representation. Cross-listed with WS-333.

REL-372: Fiction, Film and Orientalism (4.00)

Orientalism, as defined by Edward Said, is the ideology that promotes the "West-and-non-West" dichotomy and the idea that "Others are less human." Neo-Orientalism is savvier, and has a more complex and dualist nature, not all that is read or seen is neo-Orientalism narratives is wrong and pejorative, and most significantly, it is written not by outsiders about "the other" like in Orientalism, but by "authentic" insiders. Both narratives serve largely the same purpose, which is to dominate and subordinate both politically and intellectually the non-West. In this course, books and movies that have become bestsellers in the West will be analyzed for Orientalism and neo-Orientalism.

SPA-365: Black Literature in Cuba and Puerto Rico (4.00)

This course provides an examination of the Caribbean literary movement of "negrismo." Literary texts and interdisciplinary readings examine the impact of ethnicity on Cuban and Puerto Rican national identities. More contemporary media illustrate the present role of Afro-Caribbean religious traditions, such as Santería.

Course requisites: 323

War and Peace

HIS-207: The Global Middle East (4.00)

The proliferation of commodities, ideas, and peoples throughout the globe during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has led to the rise of global studies. This course explores themes in the modern Middle East in light of this "global" turn. The first three weeks will provide a theoretical background on the questions that inform the course. The discussion will start with an overview of the study of nationalism in the Middle East. It will then proceed to a discussion of approaches to that question using the "national" as a lens to study the history of the modern Middle East. Students will learn about such concepts as "transnationalism," "internationalism," and "globalization." The rest of the course will then explore various themes from the late nineteenth century to the present. This includes: the rise of the world economy, imperialism, the first wave of globalization, World War I and internationalism, diasporas and transnationalism, the global Cold War, oil, the "Global War on Terror." Finally, students will also be asked to think about the recent Arab uprisings and the merits of using transnationalism as a point of inquiry in the history of the Middle East.

HIS-230: The Vietnam Wars (4.00)

An examination of the origins, expansion, and consequences of the Vietnam Wars from Vietnamese and American perspectives. Topics include French colonialism, the rise of nationalism in Vietnam, the responses to imperialism, American foreign policy and the "wars" at home.

HIS-312: Russia and the Soviet Union in the Twentieth Century (4.00)

Revolution, ethnicity, reform, stagnation and disintegration in Russian and Soviet politics, culture, economy and society from 1905 to the present.

HIS-313: Europe in the Era of the World Wars (4.00)

World War I, Nazism, the interwar years, World War II, and the Holocaust, with emphasis on ideology, culture, and diplomacy.

HIS-314: Europe From the Cold War to the European Union (4.00)

Society, economy, culture and foreign affairs in Western and Eastern Europe, since the end of World War II, with emphasis on European division and unity, the welfare state, immigration and diversity, as well as relations with the United States.

HIS-318: The Holocaust (4.00)

Victims and perpetrators of German genocide, with emphasis on anti-Semitism, origins of the Final Solution, Nazi ideology, survivors' memories and historiographical controversies.

HIS-360: World War II in Asia on Film (4.00)

This course explores the history of World War II in Asia, especially as (re)presented and remembered in films. Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural aspects of World War II and to how films shape the collective memory of different Asian countries and the United States.

POL-282: U.S. For. Policy Since 1945 (4.00)

U.S. FOREIGN POLICY SINCE 1945--Critical interpretation and analysis of U.S. foreign policy since the end of World War II, with a special focus on the Vietnam War as a pivotal case study in understanding the Cold War. Comparisons between Cold War and post-Cold War foreign policy, changing relationships between the U.S. and its allies, former enemies and the third world and the development of new paradigms of foreign policy making.

POL-337: The Politics of the European Union (4.00)

This course charts the evolution of the European Union and examines some of the core issues facing the EU today: EU enlargement, the creation of a Common Foreign and Security Policy, EU immigration and asylum policy, and the EU-US relationship now and in the future. In addition, the course gives students a comprehensive understanding of the theories of EU integration, as well as of the major EU institutions and their roles in creating and shaping contemporary European politics.

Course requisites: One 100-level course

POL-392: Manifest Destiny in a Global World: Reconfigurations of Identity in U.S. Foreign Policy (4.00)

Examines the ongoing changes in the meaning of deeply resonant categories in U.S. foreign policy particularly after the Vietnam War. Topics include captivity narratives, race war, gender, and patriotism. Case studies include Iran, Somalia, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

Course requisites: One 100-level Pollitics course - AND - POL-201, 226 or 326

Asian Studies

HIS-113: Introduction to Japanese History (4.00)

A survey of Japanese cultural, literary and institutional history from ancient times to the present.

HIS-115: Introduction to Modern Chinese History (4.00)

This course surveys the major social, intellectual, and political developments in China from the Opium War of 1839 to the present. Themes include the fall of imperial China, the Chinese revolutions, post-Mao reforms, and contemporary Chinese social issues.

HIS-230: The Vietnam Wars (4.00)

An examination of the origins, expansion, and consequences of the Vietnam Wars from Vietnamese and American perspectives. Topics include French colonialism, the rise of nationalism in Vietnam, the responses to imperialism, American foreign policy and the "wars" at home.

HIS-352: The Chinese Revolutions (4.00)

A study of the complex sociopolitical crises of modern China, including an evaluation of the revolutions and their impacts on recent Chinese history; particular focus on the Republican Revolution of 1911, the Communist Revolution of 1949 and the Cultural Revolution.

HIS-354: Chinese Women on Film: History and the Cinematic Imagination (4.00)

This course examines the history of women and gender in China as depicted in film. Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which modernization, imperialism, and globalization have shaped women's roles and representations of women throughout the 20th century. Cross-listed with WS-354.

HIS-360: World War II in Asia on Film (4.00)

This course explores the history of World War II in Asia, especially as (re)presented and remembered in films. Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural aspects of World War II and to how films shape the collective memory of different Asian countries and the United States.

HIS-362: Modern China Through Literature & Film China (4.00)

This course uses literature and film as primary sources to examine cultural and political changes in Modern China. It is organized as a research seminar and will focus on research methods, primary sources and writing.

HIS-396: Topics in Asian History (4.00)

TOPICS IN ASIAN HISTORY--Critical examination of a specific topic in the history of Asia. Topics vary from year to year, and the course may be repeated for credit when the content changes. Meets the Humanistic Studies standard.

Description for "RACE, EMPIRE AND ISLAM IN MODERN CENTRAL ASIA"--Islamic societies of Central Asia from the Russian imperial conquest (1860s) to the present. Main topics include: Persian and Mongol cultural and political heritage, colonialsim, Islam and modernity, Soviet imperialism, gender and Islam, nationalism, contemporary cultural and religious revival, and socio-political conflict. Cross-listed with REL-399-A.

REL-233: Constructing Tibet Through Film and Literature (4.00)

This course examines the construction of Tibet as a mythic object of fantasy in the Western imagination. Close attention will be given to the way Tibet has been portrayed in a variety of literary and film genres.

European Studies

ENG-352: Studies in Postcolonial Literature (4.00)

STUDIES IN POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE--Study of literature written in nations that were formerly European colonies (for example, the literature of South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand and Canada). Cross-listed with AS-352.

Description for "AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND FILM"--This course seeks to introduce students to a selection of African literature and film from a postcolonial perspective. It examines systemic structures of domination and exploitation, colonial and local, and investigates issues of race, class, tribal affiliation, identity, and gender in order to understand both the nature of the societies depicted and the motivating impulses behind the texts we study. The interdisciplinary approach will allow us to identify the residual effects of colonization as well as the intrinsic dynamics of a selected variety of postcolonial societies in Africa within a historical context. At the same time, we will look at stylistic, formal, and technical elements to analyze and appraise the aesthetic and imaginative qualities of the assigned material. Texts originally produced in English as well as those translated from local languages may be used.

Description for "MODERN SOUTH ASIAN AND MIDDLE-EASTERN LITERATURE"--A study of literature from South Asia and the Middle East from a postcolonial historical perspective. The central focus of this course is the critical examination of relationships, interactions and outcomes among and within dominant colonial and marginalized postcolonial cultures, subcultures and groups. After examining ideas about self and the other and the social and political scale of power fostered by colonial authorities, we shall turn our attention to the postcolony with the following questions: What are the regimes of differentiation and discrimination within postcolonial societies? What aspects of these hierarchies of difference are derived from colonial rule and which aspects are endemic to the postcolonial society? How do the related, though outwardly independent, historical developments of the times, the birth of modernism, the Russian revolution, and the dismantling of British colonial rule affect South Asian and Middle-Eastern societies as reflected in their literary and artistic productions? What does the term "postcolonial" signify? How do postcolonial literature and approaches to literary works seek to identify, challenge, and subvert the continuing hierarchies of domination and subservience derived from the colonial period as well as the internal orders of privileging and difference in the postcolony? What are the advantages and disadvantages of deploying this critical approach? We shall study texts originally produced in English and may also use English translations of works, written and oral, from regional languages, in order to understand the aesthetics, cultural perspectives, and ideological positions that animate these literary and artistic productions.

Description for "LITERATURE OF SOUTH ASIA, MIDDLE EAST, AND AFRICA"--Using a historical introduction to provide a background for the debates involving the postcolonial condition and the struggle for personal, cultural, and/or national autonomy in formerly colonized areas or states, we shall proceed to an overview of the field of postcolonial literary theory to establish the context for our study before looking at postcolonial literature and films from former British colonies (and areas formerly under British control) in South-Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Occasionally, translations from works in the indigenous languages may be introduced to highlight contrasts and correspondences with work originally composed in English, or give a more inclusive view of the range and nature of responses to the colonial experience in these areas. Texts to be selected from works by, among others, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Sara Suleri, Bapsi Sidhwa, Mohsin Hamid, Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Ghassan Kanafani, Furugh Farrukhzad, Mahmoud Darwish, Adonis, Sami-ul-Qasim, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugiwa Thiongo, Tayyib Salih, Ama Ata Aidoo, and Bessie Head.

FRE-355: Topics in Francophone Literature and Culture (4.00)

Francophone literary and other texts will be analyzed with particular emphasis on colonization, decolonization, neocolonialism and nationalism, slavery, marginalization, identity and otherness, language and orality. Specific regions of Francophone production may include Canada, Africa, Europe, the Caribbean and Asia. This course may be repeated when specific content varies. Cross-listed with AS-355.

Course requisites: 230 and one 200-level literature class

FRE-396: Topics French Lit & Culture Culture (4.00)

Topic changes by semester, as determined in advance by the instructor and in consultation with the French faculty. This course may be repeated as specific content varies.

Course requisites: FRE-230

GER-220: Introduction to German Cultural Studies (4.00)

This course introduces students to theories and methods that facilitate an interdisciplinary approach to German cultural texts, ranging from literature to music and to visual arts. Taught in English.

GER-340: The History, Literature and Culture of Afro-Germans (4.00)

THE HISTORY, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE OF AFRO-GERMANS--This course focuses on the history, literature and culture of people of African descent living in German-speaking countries and on discourses of German identity. Cross-listed with AS-340.

Description when topic is "'OTHER GERMANS' AFRICAN DIASPORA IN GERMAN-SPEAKING EUROPE". This course investigates the long and multifaceted history and culture of the African diaspora in the German-speaking countries, including the influence of African science and culture in 18th-century Germany, the German-African/African-American connections during colonialist times, African peoples' marginalisation and persecution under National Socialism, the experience of African-American soldiers as post-World-War II occupation troops, and black Germans as members of 20th/21st-century re-unified Germany. Taught in English. (German Majors/Minors will have opportunities to apply language skills by working with German-language texts/films and some writing in German.)

GER-351: Topics in Contemp German Life & Thought (4.00)

This course explores selected topics and debates in contemporary Germany, ranging from German reunification to environmental politics, gender discourses, and immigration policies. Cross-listed with WS-351.

Course requisites: GER-202 or higher

HIS-102: Europe, At Peace & At War, From 1789 to The Present (4.00)

European culture, society and politics since the French Revolution, with a focus on war and peace, nations and nationalism, Nazism and the Holocaust, imperialism and racism, communism and post-communism, women and feminism, romanticism and modernism.

HIS-220: European Women Since the Middle Ages (4.00)

Experiences of and ideas about European women in the public and private spheres from the late Middle Ages through the 20th century. Cross-listed with WS-220.

HIS-311: Europe in the Victorian Era (4.00)

Industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, international affairs, culture, gender and public and private life in 19th-century Europe.

HIS-312: Russia and the Soviet Union in the Twentieth Century (4.00)

Revolution, ethnicity, reform, stagnation and disintegration in Russian and Soviet politics, culture, economy and society from 1905 to the present.

HIS-313: Europe in the Era of the World Wars (4.00)

World War I, Nazism, the interwar years, World War II, and the Holocaust, with emphasis on ideology, culture, and diplomacy.

HIS-314: Europe From the Cold War to the European Union (4.00)

Society, economy, culture and foreign affairs in Western and Eastern Europe, since the end of World War II, with emphasis on European division and unity, the welfare state, immigration and diversity, as well as relations with the United States.

HIS-318: The Holocaust (4.00)

Victims and perpetrators of German genocide, with emphasis on anti-Semitism, origins of the Final Solution, Nazi ideology, survivors' memories and historiographical controversies.

POL-337: The Politics of the European Union (4.00)

This course charts the evolution of the European Union and examines some of the core issues facing the EU today: EU enlargement, the creation of a Common Foreign and Security Policy, EU immigration and asylum policy, and the EU-US relationship now and in the future. In addition, the course gives students a comprehensive understanding of the theories of EU integration, as well as of the major EU institutions and their roles in creating and shaping contemporary European politics.

Course requisites: One 100-level course

POL-370: Politics of Democratic Socialism (4.00)

Social democracy, though prominent in many countries around the world, has been virtually invisible in the United States. This course will examine the range and diversity of social democracy by analyzing its theoretical origins and evolving political practices to shed light on the different meanings of contemporary social democracy. It will trace the theoretical roots of the movement and examine the ideological splits that produced diversity within democratic socialism as well as divergence from other left ideologies such as populism, progressivism, communism, and anarchism in this country and others. What were the key elements and planks of socialist platforms in representative countries and what reforms did social democracy advocate in the 20th century? What led to striking political successes after WWII in many European countries? Why did social democracy go into decline at the end of the twentieth century? What are the prospects for a revitalized social democracy or New Left parties today? Various cases studies will address questions such as: was the New Deal an American version of social democracy? What is the Swedish model of social democracy? Can social democracy offer a viable path to development in lesser developed countries such as Brazil?

SPA-307: Spanish Civilization & Culture (4.00)

Important historical events, trends and ideas of Spain from earliest times to the present.

Course requisites: SPA-202 or higher graded C- or above (except SPA-206)

SPA-361: Twentieth Century Spain (4.00)

Examines how societal changes throughout the century are reflected in representative works of literature and other forms of artistic expression such as film and painting. Topics include the avant-garde, the dictatorship of Francisco Franco and the transition to democracy.

Course requisites: 323

Foreign Language Requirement

Each major is expected to acquire proficiency in a foreign language.  For French, Spansh, and German, students should take at least one class beyond 202. For Chinese and Japanese, students should take through 202 plus one Asian Studies course.  Please consult with the IR program director if you wish to pursue a language other than those listed above.

Study Abroad

Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad. A suitable course of study should be chosen with the help of the student's advisor. Courses taken abroad often count toward the IR major requirements but these must be approved by the IR Program Director.

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