Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the Economics Major

A major in economics requires a minimum of 40 credits in economics.  Economics 104 and 105 may not be taken concurrently.  One course in statistics is a prerequisite for ECO-338 (ECO-215 , MAT-115, or PSY-206).

Required Courses

ECO-104: Introduction to Macroeconomics (4.00)

Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105: Introduction to Microeconomics (4.00)

Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scarce resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

ECO-206: Intermediate Microeconomics (4.00)

This course covers intermediate microeconomics, which uses economic and mathematical tools to analyze the actions of individuals and households, firms and industries. The course is based on the market system: how markets work, when and why they fail, and what can be done to make them work better. The course also examines a number of public policies and current economic issues.

Course requisites: ECO-104, ECO-105, and MAT-118

ECO-207: Macroeconomics (4.00)

General model is developed to analyze theories of inflation and unemployment. Evaluation of theoretical bases for different monetary and fiscal policies.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

ECO-338: Econometrics (4.00)

Study of sampling, statistical significance, correlation and regression analysis with emphasis placed on their application to economic problems.

Course requisites: ECO 104, 105, and 1 course in statistics.

ECO-400: Senior Seminar in Economics (4.00)

Overview of research methods and analysis of a set of current economic policy issues, with emphasis on the completion of a student-designed research project. Open only to senior majors and minors in economics and in economics and organizational management.

Course requisites: 306, 307, 338 and senior standing

Calculus

One course in calculus (MAT-118 or higher)

MAT-118: Calculus I (4.00)

Introduction to the basic concepts of differential and integral calculus, emphasizing conceptual understanding and applications. Topics are covered from a graphical, algebraic and numerical perspective. Mathematical writing is emphasized.

300 or 400 level courses

Four courses at the 300 or 400 level (excluding BUS-370 and ECO/BUS-450 internships)

ECO-303: Labor Economics (4.00)

Study of how wages and employment levels are determined. The course will stress the application of economic theory to important policy issues such as immigration, executive compensation, unions, minimum wage laws, welfare policies, occupational health and safety standards and antidiscrimination policies.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or 105

ECO-309: Money, Banking & Financial Markets (4.00)

Evolution of the banking system and related issues of public policy. Analysis of monetary factors and their impact on economic activity.

Course requisites: ECO-102 or 104

ECO-330: Poverty, Inequality & Discrimination (4.00)

This seminar examines selected topics on poverty, inequality and discrimination. Topics include the measurement, extent and causes of poverty in the U.S. and around the world; race and sex discrimination in the workplace; and changes in the distribution of income and wealth. Special attention is focused on policy issues including affirmative action, the minimum wage and welfare reform.

Course requisites: ECO-105 and 1 statistics course

ECO-334: Economic Development (4.00)

Historical patterns and contemporary theories of economic development are used to clarify major issues such as the distribution of income, stabilization policy and problems of trade and finance.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

ECO-345: Health Economics (4.00)

This course analyzes the economics of health care in the United States with a focus on health policy. Topics include obesity, smoking, and insurance. Cross-listed with PH-345.

Course requisites: ECO-105 (and ECO-206 recommended but not required).

ECO-346: Behavioral Economics and Finance (4.00)

This course introduces students to regression methods for analyzing data in economics and related areas. It addresses both the theoretical and practical aspects of statistical analysis, focusing on techniques for estimating econometric models of various kinds and interpreting the estimates from such models. The objective is for the students to learn how to conduct - and how to critique - empirical studies in economics and related fields. Accordingly, the emphasis of the course is on empirical applications. The mathematics of econometrics will be introduced only as needed and will not be a central focus.

Course requisites: ECO-104 & 105

ECO-351: International Trade (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international trade. We will discuss various trade models, the welfare and distributional effects of free trade among countries, trade policy instruments, reasons for limiting trade, and economic integration.

Course requisites: Take ECO-101 or ECO-105;

ECO-352: International Finance (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international finance. We will discuss the balance of payments, functioning of foreign exchange markets, automatic and policy adjustments in the balance of payments, coordination of national economic policies, and international monetary system.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or ECO-104

ECO-353: International Economic Institutions (4.00)

This course will discuss the role of international economic institutions in promoting trade, development and financial stability in the global economy. It will focus on three main institutions: the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

ECO-410: Directed Reading (1.00)

Supervised intensive study in a special field of economics.

ECO-440: Directed Research (4.00)

Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to a particular field of intellectual or artistic interest, or to non-majors who demonstrate sufficient preparation in the discipline. Applications are available in the Office of Academic Advising and must be returned to the assistant dean of the college for approval. A 440 course carries 4 semester hours of credit.

ECO-490: Senior Thesis (4.00)

A senior thesis in the student's major gives superior students the opportunity to write a thesis about a project related to a particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Interested students should obtain thesis guidelines (available in the Office of Academic Advising) and apply in writing to the appropriate department chair or program chair. A 490 course carries 4 semester hours of credit.

Requirements for the Economics Minor

Required Courses

Economics 104, 105, 338, and either 206 or 207.

ECO-104: Introduction to Macroeconomics (4.00)

Macroeconomics examines aggregate aspects of the economy. Topics covered include economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. International topics covered include balance of payments and exchange rates.

ECO-105: Introduction to Microeconomics (4.00)

Microeconomics studies how individuals and firms allocate scarce resources via markets. In addition to an introduction to microeconomics, this course examines topics such as monopoly and competition, taxes and government interventions in the economy, and international trade.

ECO-338: Econometrics (4.00)

Study of sampling, statistical significance, correlation and regression analysis with emphasis placed on their application to economic problems.

Course requisites: ECO 104, 105, and 1 course in statistics.

ECO-206: Intermediate Microeconomics (4.00)

This course covers intermediate microeconomics, which uses economic and mathematical tools to analyze the actions of individuals and households, firms and industries. The course is based on the market system: how markets work, when and why they fail, and what can be done to make them work better. The course also examines a number of public policies and current economic issues.

Course requisites: ECO-104, ECO-105, and MAT-118

ECO-207: Macroeconomics (4.00)

General model is developed to analyze theories of inflation and unemployment. Evaluation of theoretical bases for different monetary and fiscal policies.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

300 Level Courses

Three courses at the 300 level.

ECO-303: Labor Economics (4.00)

Study of how wages and employment levels are determined. The course will stress the application of economic theory to important policy issues such as immigration, executive compensation, unions, minimum wage laws, welfare policies, occupational health and safety standards and antidiscrimination policies.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or 105

ECO-309: Money, Banking & Financial Markets (4.00)

Evolution of the banking system and related issues of public policy. Analysis of monetary factors and their impact on economic activity.

Course requisites: ECO-102 or 104

ECO-330: Poverty, Inequality & Discrimination (4.00)

This seminar examines selected topics on poverty, inequality and discrimination. Topics include the measurement, extent and causes of poverty in the U.S. and around the world; race and sex discrimination in the workplace; and changes in the distribution of income and wealth. Special attention is focused on policy issues including affirmative action, the minimum wage and welfare reform.

Course requisites: ECO-105 and 1 statistics course

ECO-334: Economic Development (4.00)

Historical patterns and contemporary theories of economic development are used to clarify major issues such as the distribution of income, stabilization policy and problems of trade and finance.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

ECO-345: Health Economics (4.00)

This course analyzes the economics of health care in the United States with a focus on health policy. Topics include obesity, smoking, and insurance. Cross-listed with PH-345.

Course requisites: ECO-105 (and ECO-206 recommended but not required).

ECO-346: Behavioral Economics and Finance (4.00)

This course introduces students to regression methods for analyzing data in economics and related areas. It addresses both the theoretical and practical aspects of statistical analysis, focusing on techniques for estimating econometric models of various kinds and interpreting the estimates from such models. The objective is for the students to learn how to conduct - and how to critique - empirical studies in economics and related fields. Accordingly, the emphasis of the course is on empirical applications. The mathematics of econometrics will be introduced only as needed and will not be a central focus.

Course requisites: ECO-104 & 105

ECO-351: International Trade (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international trade. We will discuss various trade models, the welfare and distributional effects of free trade among countries, trade policy instruments, reasons for limiting trade, and economic integration.

Course requisites: Take ECO-101 or ECO-105;

ECO-352: International Finance (4.00)

This course will introduce the basics and theory of international finance. We will discuss the balance of payments, functioning of foreign exchange markets, automatic and policy adjustments in the balance of payments, coordination of national economic policies, and international monetary system.

Course requisites: ECO-101 or ECO-104

ECO-353: International Economic Institutions (4.00)

This course will discuss the role of international economic institutions in promoting trade, development and financial stability in the global economy. It will focus on three main institutions: the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization.

Course requisites: ECO-104 and ECO-105

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