Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the Classical Civilizations Major

  • At least ten courses plus SUM-400
  • At least one language course at the 300 level in Latin or Greek
  • Classical History and Culture 121 and 122
  • Classical Literature 332 or 396
  • Classical History and Culture 343 or 395
  • At least five other courses selected from Greek, Latin and Classics, including ART-201, PHI-206, PHI-321, and THE-322

Requirements for the Classical Civilization Minor

Six courses in Greek, Latin, or Classics, at least one course at the 300 level.

Courses

Classical History and Culture

CLA-121: Greek Civilization (4.00)

The literature, people and ideas of the ancient Greeks from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times, including the basic outline of events with methods for understanding history and culture. Cross-listed with HIS-121.

CLA-122: Roman Civilization (4.00)

The development of Roman institutions from the Etruscan period through Constantine's adoption of Christianity as evidenced from literature, art and archaeology in constructing Roman social history. Cross-listed with HIS-122.

CLA-243: Sexuality, Gender and Power in Greece and Rome (4.00)

This course examines sexuality and gender as discourses of power in Greece and Rome through a variety of primary literary and material culture sources. It will simultaneously introduce modern scholarly approaches to these issues, including Foucauldian analysis; feminist theory; queer studies; and gender theory. Cross-listed with WS-243.

CLA-295: Topics in Classical Studies Wives, Warriors, Slaves and Citizens (4.00)

TOPICS IN CLASSICAL STUDIES--This course examines topics in the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, with emphasis on historial, political, and cultural developments and their presentation in ancient and modern texts. May be repeated when the topic changes. Description for "ART/ARCHITECTURE/PROPAGANDA IN ROMAN EMPIRE"--This course examines how religion, mythology, and public opinion were altered, manipulated, and employed in art and architecture during the Roman Empire not only to keep the emperors in power but also to express and underpin their political ideals and goals. Rather than tackling the issue chronologically, we will instead begin with an overview of the core Roman pantheon, proceed to broad topics such as the creation of new gods for the imperial families, the exchange of religion in the Romanization of the provinces, and the imperial cult, and end with a discussion of modern America's use of the classical world in its own propaganda. No prerequisite for this topic. Cross-listed with ART-296.

CLA-343: Sexuality, Gender and Power in Greece and Rome (4.00)

Advanced study of sexuality and gender as discourses of power in Greece and Rome through a variety of primary literary and material culture sources. The course will simultaneously introduce modern scholarly approaches to these issues, including Foucauldian analysis; feminist theory; queer studies; and gender theory. (Meets with CLA-243, and students may choose to take the course as 243 or 343, but not both).

CLA-395: Topics in Classical Studies Wives, Warriors, Slaves and Citizens (4.00)

TOPICS IN CLASSICAL STUDIES--This course examines topics in the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, with emphasis on historial, political, and cultural developments and their presentation in ancient and modern texts. Recent offerings include Racism (or not) in Classical Antiquity and Roman Law. May be repeated when the topic changes.

Description for "RACE AND ETHNICITY IN ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN"--This course introduces students to the cultural formations of race and ethnicity in the ancient Mediterranean mainly through literary and historical-ethnographic texts, though with reference to the visual and material record as well. In it, we will trace the history of the creation of difference, discrimination, and stereotyping in Greece and Rome through their views on regions ranging from Britain to India and from Libya to Germany. It will also cover topics including environmental determinism, enslavement, autochthony, immigration, citizenship, and multiculturalism. Secondary source texts include modern theoretical treatments on race and ethnicity.

Description for "ROMAN LAW"--This course is an introduction to the Roman legal system and the role of law in Roman society. Over a thousand-year period (500 BC- 500 AD), the Romans created the ancient world's most comprehensive body of law, whose legacy would have a profound influence on modern western law. This course will utilize both real and imagined cases to help students grapple with the realities of the Roman law and explore its uses in context. Students will also have the opportunity to write their own cases for the class to explore. No previous knowledge of Latin or Roman history is required.

Description for "THE GENEALOGY OF ANCIENT HISTORY"--During the course of the semester we will explore the origins of the genre that will come to be called 'history' by looking at the Herodotus' Histories and Thucydides History of the Peloponnesian War. We will discuss the traditional interpretation of the rise of this genre by modern scholars, and then juxtapose these historical texts with contemporary literature in the folk tale, praise poetry, tragedy, comedy, philosophy, science, and medicine, in order to arrive at an enriched understanding of the genealogy of historical narrative. We will discuss issues of importance for our own period and for ancient Greece, such as the role of narrative art in historical writing that allies it (uncomfortably for modern historians) to fiction, and interrogate the ability of any narrative to accurately reflect 'the past'. Armed with an understanding of the diverse intellectual genres that animate historical writing, we will focus upon the powerful didactic role played by history in preparing citizens for leadership roles in the Greek city-state. Positive and negative leadership models crowd the historical stage and provide crucial evidence for the aim of history at its start.

Course requisites: Any Classics course or permission of instructor

Classical Literature

All classical literature courses are taught using sources translated into English and do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

CLL-232: Mythology (4.00)

The study of Classical Mythology as a dynamic and evolving system, focusing primarily on literary sources, including modern retellings of myths of Greece and Rome. Cross-listed with CLL-332.

CLL-332: Mythology (4.00)

Advanced study of Classical Mythology as a dynamic and evolving system, focusing primarily on literary sources, including modern retellings of myths of Greece and Rome. Cross-listed with CLL-232.

Course requisites: 1 course in Classics (CLA or CLL), Latin or Greek

CLL-396: Topics in Classical Literature (4.00)

TOPICS IN CLASSICAL LITERATURE--This course examines topics in the literature of ancient Greece and Rome, with emphasis on historical and cultural background, literary genres and criticism, and/or the influence of classical literature on later periods. Recent offerings include "Disease and Disability" and "Origins of Freedom." May be repeated if the topic changes.

Description for "DIDACTIC POETRY"--The tradition of didactic poetry in the classical world provides both guides to and commentaries on the process of learning in a range of fields, from astronomy and agriculture, philosophy to love. This course will examine texts by Roman authors composed in the first century BCE with an eye in particular to how learning is dramatized in the poetry of Lucretius, Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, and how the range of topics covered by the authors in question respond to the dramatically changing political climate during which the authors lived and wrote.

Course requisites: Any 200-level literature class in any language & literature department; or 1 course in subjects CLL, GRE or LAT.

Greek

GRE-101: Elementary Greek I (4.00)

The fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar with selected reading.

GRE-102: Elementary Greek II (4.00)

Readings from Greek authors, especially New Testament writers.

GRE-211: Intermediate Greek I (4.00)

Readings from Greek literature, usually prose. Authors may include Herodotus, Longus, Lysias, and/or Plato, among others.

Course requisites: GRE-102 or department placement

GRE-212: Intermediate Greek II (4.00)

Readings from Greek literature, usually poetry. Authors include Aristophanes, Euripedes, Homer, Sappho, and/or Sophocles, among others.

Course requisites: GRE-211 or departmental placement

GRE-311: Greek Prose (4.00)

Readings from Greek prose. Authors may include Herodotus, Longus, Lysias, and/or Plato, among others, representing the genres of History, Ancient Novel, Oratory, and Philosophy. May be repeated when the topic changes.

Course requisites: GRE-211 and GRE-212 or departmental placement

GRE-312: Greek Poetry (4.00)

Readings from Greek poetry. Authors may include Aristophanes, Euripides, Homer, Sappho, and/or Sophocles, among others, representing the genres of Comedy, Tragedy, Epic and Lyric. May be repeated when the topic changes.

Course requisites: GRE-211 and 212 or departmental permission

GRE-350: Advanced Reading Course (2.00)

Selections from Greek prose and poetry, not covered in other courses, chosen to meet the needs of individual students.

Course requisites: GRE-211 and 212

Latin

LAT-101: Elementary Latin I (4.00)

Fundamentals of Latin grammar with selected reading.

LAT-102: Elementary Latin II (4.00)

Readings from Latin authors, with emphasis on the love poetry of Catullus.

Course requisites: 101

LAT-201: Intermediate Latin I (4.00)

Review of Latin Grammar with readings from Apuleius and other Latin authors.

Course requisites: 102

LAT-202: Intermediate Latin II (4.00)

Readings of Latin poetry. Authors may include Catullus, Virgil, and/or Ovid, among others.

Course requisites: 201

LAT-211: Latin Prose (Xlist LAT-311) (4.00)

Readings from Latin prose. Authors may include Cicero, Pliny, Sallust, Senece, or Tacitus, among others, representing the genres of Oratory, Letters, Philosophy, and History. May be repeated when the topic changes. Cross-listed with LAT-311.

Course requisites: LAT-202 or departmental placement

LAT-213: Sunoikisis Inter-Campus Course (4.00)

This course offers a unique collaborative experience for undergraduates. In addition to regular class meetings, each course includes weekly live-streamed lectures from an expert in the subject and other faculty teaching the course at their own institutions. May be repeated if the material changes. Cross-listed with LAT-313.

Course requisites: Latin 202

LAT-214: Latin Literature (4.00)

Readings from Latin prose and poetry, organized around a theme of particular interest to faculty and students. May be repeated when the topic changes. Cross-listed with LAT-314.

Course requisites: LAT-202 or department placement

LAT-302: Leadership Through Latin Poetry (4.00)

Readings of Latin, usually poetry, and practicum in leadership skills through peer mentoring and leading class discussion. Authors may include Catullus, Ovid, or Virgil, among others. May be repeated when the topic changes.

Course requisites: Latin 202 or departmental placement

LAT-311: Latin Prose (Xlist LAT-211) (4.00)

Readings from Latin prose. Authors may include Cicero, Pliny, Sallust, Senece, or Tacitus, among others, representing the genres of Oratory, Letters, Philosophy, and History. May be repeated when the topic changes. Cross-listed with LAT-211.

Course requisites: LAT-202 or departmental placement

LAT-313: Sunoikisis Inter-Campus Course (4.00)

This course offers a unique collaborative experience for undergraduates. In addition to regular class meetings, each course includes weekly live-streamed lectures from an expert in the subject and other faculty teaching the course at their own institutions. May be repeated if the material changes. Cross-listed with LAT-213.

Course requisites: One 200-level course beyond 201

LAT-314: Latin Literature (4.00)

Readings from Latin prose and poetry, organized around a theme of particular interest to faculty and students. May be repeated when the topic changes. Cross-listed with LAT-214.

Course requisites: LAT-202 or departmental placement

LAT-350: Advanced Reading Course (2.00)

Selections from Latin prose and poetry, not covered in other courses, chosen to meet the needs of individual students.

Course requisites: 202 and the department's permission

Other Courses

SUM-400: Portfolio Capstone (2.00)

Students collect significant academic artifacts over the course of their time at Agnes Scott and enroll in this 2-credit course in the fall of their senior year. In class, students work together to reflect on the processes of individual artifact curation and to consider both the digital space itself and the roles of digital identity, copyright, and collaboration. Students curate the contents of their portfolio to highlight specific information and thereby communicate the knowledge, experiences, and skills of their choosing to a post-Agnes Scott audience.

ART-201: Art of Ancient Greece and Rome (4.00)

Examination of the art and architecture of the classical world from the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome. Focus on the evolution of Greek temples, the quest for naturalism in sculpture and the refinement of Black and Red figure pottery. In Rome, we will consider the changes in scale, function and use of building materials, the political landscape and the emphasis on portraiture and illusionistic wall painting. Cross-listed with CLA-242.

Course requisites: 150

PHI-206: Ancient Philosophy (4.00)

History of Ancient Philosophy. The thought of the major figures in Western philosophy from the pre-Socratic era to the Hellenistic Age.

Course requisites: Any 100-level PHI course except PHI-103.

PHI-321: Plato and Aristotle (4.00)

Advanced study of selected topics in Plato and Aristotle. Cross-listed with CLA-321.

Course requisites: Any 200-level PHI course or permission of instructor.

THE-322: Theatrical Origins and Traditions (4.00)

A consideration of the origin of theatre and the establishment of significant theatrical traditions in selected countries. Emphases include comparisons of European and Asian forms and theatre in social, civic and religious contexts.

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