Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the Chemistry Major

Courses Required in the Discipline

Introductory Course

CHE-150: Introduction to Chemistry (3.00)

This course delves into the world of atoms and molecules in order to study the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. The course will provide an introduction to the field of chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, acids and bases, enthalpy, and equilibrium. In addition, contemporary problems and applications of these topics may be explored. Examples may include atomic and molecular structure relevant to the design of new material such as memory metals; stoichiometry as a means of achieving green chemistry; acids and bases in the context of biochemical and environmental reactions; enthalpy in the context of energy generating fuels; and equilibrium and its role in energy storing batteries.

Course requisites: Take CHE-150L

CHE-150L: Intro Basic Chemical Lab Techniques (1.00)

This lab course focuses on the experimental methods in basic scientific measurements, elementary reactions and analysis arranged around a theme such as forensics or the environment.

Course requisites: CHE-150 prereq or coreq for CHE-150L

Foundation Courses

CHE-220: Foundations of Inorganic & Physical Chem (3.00)

This foundation course focuses on introductory aspects of inorganic and physical chemistry. Topics may include fundamental chemical reactions, nuclear structure and radioactivity, molecular shapes, trends as seen in the periodic table, equilibrium, gas laws, molecular collision theory, the laws of thermodynamics, phases, reaction rates and reaction mechanisms. To illustrate the role of chemistry in fundamental physical and chemical behaviors, examples are chosen from a variety of areas including environmental, medical, and forensic applications.

Course requisites: CHE-150 and CHE-150L, minimum grade C- Take CHE-220L

CHE-220L: Foundation Inorganic & Physical Chem Lab (1.00)

Labs introduce students to the analysis and interpretation of observations. This course will also illustrate fundamental principals of chemistry including: reactivity of main group and transition metals; bonding and its relation to behavior; solution behavior; gas laws; heat capacity and enthalpy changes; and kinetics of reactions.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-220

CHE-230: Analytical Chemistry I (4.00)

This foundational course centers on quantitative chemical analysis. Students will study chemical equilibria including acid base chemistry, buffers, and solubility as well as various methods used to measure chemical species in solution such as titrimetry, electrochemistry, absorption, spectroscopy, and chromatography.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L;

CHE-240: Organic Chemistry I (3.00)

The systematic study of the chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on theories of structure and reactivity. Specific topics include basic organic molecular structure and bonding, isomerism, stereochemistry, molecular energetics, substitution and elimination reactions, and reactions of biologically relevant functional groups.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240L

CHE-240L: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1.00)

Introduction to fundamental experimental techniques of carbon based molecules, including organic synthesis, purification and separation techniques, and theory and interpretation of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240

CHE-260: Physical Chemistry I (2.00)

This course is a continuation of the introduction to physical chemistry that began in CHE-220. Topics will include general principles of thermodynamics and equilibria, kinetics and solution dynamics, and an introduction to quantum mechanics as applied in chemistry and biochemistry. More specifically, students will study such topics as the dependence of Gibbs energy on temperature and pressure, mixtures and solutions, theories of reaction rates, the Schrodinger equation, molecular orbital theory, and a brief introduction to symmetry.

Course requisites: CHE-220 & CHE-220L; MAT-119 or equivalent

CHE-300: Introduction to Biochemistry/Lab (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways and regulation of biochemical processes. Fundamental biochemical laboratory techniques including spectroscopy, enzymology, chromatographic separations, and protein detection methods. Cross-listed with BIO-300.

Course requisites: CHE-240 & 240L (BIO-110/L & 111/L also prereqs for BIO mjrs)

In-depth Laboratory

One of the following courses:

CHE-335: Adv Analytical Chemistry Lab (4.00)

This laboratory course is a hands-on experimental experience investigating an original chemical analysis problem using a number of instrumental methods. The problems may be chemical, environmental, or biochemical in nature depending on student interests. Students will identify a scientific question, and formulate an experimental design and conduct experiments utilizing two or more departmental instruments such as the NMR, FTIR, GC, GC-MS, HPLC, FAAS. Students will also gain experience on obtaining and preparing samples, analyzing and interpreting data, and drawing valid conclusions based on experimental results. Cross-listed with PH-335.

Course requisites: CHE-230 (pre-req) CHE-330 (co-req) Take CHE-330

CHE-365: Physical Chemistry Lab (4.00)

This is an in-depth laboratory based course that will allow students to study key experimental physical chemistry concepts, gain experience with equipment and instrumentation used in physical chemistry research, and increase their understanding of fundamental physical chemistry topics through hands-on experiments. Topics will span the fields of thermodynamics, kinetics and quantum mechanics and students will use a variety of scientific instruments and equipment. A significant amount of time will also be spent on data analysis and calculations.

Course requisites: CHE-150/150L, CHE-220/220L, and MAT-119 (or 119 equivalent)

CHE-375: Modern Inorganic Chemistry Lab (4.00)

This in-depth lab course focuses on the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds and the correlation of structures with contemporary crystal field and ligand field theories. Target molecules will include examples of cluster structures such as organotransition metal metallocarboranes and their precursors along with traditional transition metal complexes. Synthesis techniques will focus on oxygen-free and microscale reactions. Students will prepare publication-ready lab reports that include budgetary and safety discussions.

Course requisites: CHE-370 (taken previously or concurrently)

Courses Required Outside of the Discipline

  • Mathematics 119 (or equivalent)
  • Physics 102 (non-caluculus-based) or Physics 202 (calculus-based)

MAT-119: Calculus II (4.00)

Continuation of 118. Topics include the integral and its applications, techniques of integration, improper integrals and an introduction to series and differential equations.

Course requisites: 118 with a minimum grade of C-

PHY-102: Elements of Physics I/Lab (4.00)

Quantitative discussion of physical phenomena. Knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. This course does not count toward a major or minor in physics or astrophysics. Students planning to major or minor in physics or astrophysics should take Physics 202-203. Physics 102/Lab satisfies the lab science distribution requirement. Credit cannot be received for both PHY-102 and PHY-202. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

PHY-202: Intro Physics I/Lab: Mechanics (4.00)

A calculus-based course with laboratory covering Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, and other classical physics topics. Credit cannot be received for both PHY-102 and 202. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: Prereq MAT-118; Pre- or coreq MAT-119 Corequisite MAT-119

Requirements for the American Chemical Society Approved Chemistry Major

Courses Required in the Discipline

Introductory Course

CHE-150: Introduction to Chemistry (3.00)

This course delves into the world of atoms and molecules in order to study the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. The course will provide an introduction to the field of chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, acids and bases, enthalpy, and equilibrium. In addition, contemporary problems and applications of these topics may be explored. Examples may include atomic and molecular structure relevant to the design of new material such as memory metals; stoichiometry as a means of achieving green chemistry; acids and bases in the context of biochemical and environmental reactions; enthalpy in the context of energy generating fuels; and equilibrium and its role in energy storing batteries.

Course requisites: Take CHE-150L

CHE-150L: Intro Basic Chemical Lab Techniques (1.00)

This lab course focuses on the experimental methods in basic scientific measurements, elementary reactions and analysis arranged around a theme such as forensics or the environment.

Course requisites: CHE-150 prereq or coreq for CHE-150L

Foundation Courses

CHE-220: Foundations of Inorganic & Physical Chem (3.00)

This foundation course focuses on introductory aspects of inorganic and physical chemistry. Topics may include fundamental chemical reactions, nuclear structure and radioactivity, molecular shapes, trends as seen in the periodic table, equilibrium, gas laws, molecular collision theory, the laws of thermodynamics, phases, reaction rates and reaction mechanisms. To illustrate the role of chemistry in fundamental physical and chemical behaviors, examples are chosen from a variety of areas including environmental, medical, and forensic applications.

Course requisites: CHE-150 and CHE-150L, minimum grade C- Take CHE-220L

CHE-220L: Foundation Inorganic & Physical Chem Lab (1.00)

Labs introduce students to the analysis and interpretation of observations. This course will also illustrate fundamental principals of chemistry including: reactivity of main group and transition metals; bonding and its relation to behavior; solution behavior; gas laws; heat capacity and enthalpy changes; and kinetics of reactions.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-220

CHE-230: Analytical Chemistry I (4.00)

This foundational course centers on quantitative chemical analysis. Students will study chemical equilibria including acid base chemistry, buffers, and solubility as well as various methods used to measure chemical species in solution such as titrimetry, electrochemistry, absorption, spectroscopy, and chromatography.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L;

CHE-240: Organic Chemistry I (3.00)

The systematic study of the chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on theories of structure and reactivity. Specific topics include basic organic molecular structure and bonding, isomerism, stereochemistry, molecular energetics, substitution and elimination reactions, and reactions of biologically relevant functional groups.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240L

CHE-240L: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1.00)

Introduction to fundamental experimental techniques of carbon based molecules, including organic synthesis, purification and separation techniques, and theory and interpretation of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240

CHE-260: Physical Chemistry I (2.00)

This course is a continuation of the introduction to physical chemistry that began in CHE-220. Topics will include general principles of thermodynamics and equilibria, kinetics and solution dynamics, and an introduction to quantum mechanics as applied in chemistry and biochemistry. More specifically, students will study such topics as the dependence of Gibbs energy on temperature and pressure, mixtures and solutions, theories of reaction rates, the Schrodinger equation, molecular orbital theory, and a brief introduction to symmetry.

Course requisites: CHE-220 & CHE-220L; MAT-119 or equivalent

CHE-270: Foundation Inorganic & Bioinorganic Chem (2.00)

This foundation course in inorganic chemistry examines the behavior of the elements in an effort to identify and explain patterns on the periodic table. The course focuses on the approximately 28 elements with known roles in biochemical systems including iron, copper, zinc, Na+/K+ , Mg+2, and Ca+2. Topics include the toxicity of environmental pollutants and the often surprising toxicity of nutritionally required elements such as iron and copper. Recent discoveries and case studies are used to explain biochemical selectivity in a wide variety of systems; plant, animal and archaea.

Course requisites: CHE-220 CHE-220L;

CHE-300: Introduction to Biochemistry/Lab (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways and regulation of biochemical processes. Fundamental biochemical laboratory techniques including spectroscopy, enzymology, chromatographic separations, and protein detection methods. Cross-listed with BIO-300.

Course requisites: CHE-240 & 240L (BIO-110/L & 111/L also prereqs for BIO mjrs)

In-depth Courses

16 additional credits from the following courses:

CHE-330: Analytical Chemistry II (4.00)

Advanced study of chemical instrumental analysis with an emphasis on understanding the major instrumental methods chemists use to study chemical phenomena. Techniques include absorption and emission spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrochemistry.

Course requisites: CHE-230 (or old course # CHE-211)

CHE-340: Organic Chemistry II (3.00)

This course is a continuation of CHE-240 and it continues the systematic study of the principal functional groups in organic compounds. Specific topics include the theory and chemical reactivity of conjugated and aromatic systems, the fundamentals of organic synthesis, and reactions of biologically relevant functional groups.

Course requisites: CHE-240 CHE-240L pre-requisites CHE-340L coreq Take CHE-340L

CHE-340L: Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1.00)

Project based synthesis based laboratories including functional group analyses and reactions. Use of advanced instrumentation including nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy and GC-MS are required for analysis of project results.

Course requisites: CHE-240 CHE-240L pre-reqs; CHE-340 co-req Take CHE-340

CHE-350: Medicinal Organic Chemistry (4.00)

Drug discovery and development is the study of how biological targets for new drugs are selected, and how appropriate drugs for those targets are identified and brought to market. It is an interdisciplinary subject that draws from biology, chemistry and biochemistry to help us understand the interaction of a drug with a biological target, how the drug reaches its target in the body, and how it is eliminated once its function is achieved. Since a biologically active drug results from many years of experimental work in drug design and development, structure-activity relationships and drug structure optimization are topics also discussed in this course.

Course requisites: CHE-240 and 240L

CHE-360: Physical Chemistry II (4.00)

An advanced course that builds on concepts learned in the foundational physical chemistry courses (CHE-220 and CHE-260). Topics covered will include quantum mechanics, spectroscopy and materials science.

CHE-370: Modern Inorganic Chemistry (4.00)

This in-depth course introduces current theories of bonding, group theory and molecular symmetry, molecular and solid state structures, magnetism, stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms involving both main group elements and transition metals. Classes of molecules will include main group, metal, and hybrid clusters and the emerging field of molecular super-atoms. Descriptions of the bonding in such molecules will include Wade's Rules for clusters and molecular orbital descriptions of exotic molecules (e.g. the interstellar CH5 + and interstitial structures (e.g. He@C60).

Course requisites: CHE-270

CHE-385: Advanced Biochem & Molecular Biology (4.00)

Advanced, project-based interdisciplinary course involving laboratory research and analysis of primary literature in the fields of biochemistry and molecular biology. Cross-listed with BIO-385.

Course requisites: BIO-216 or CHE-300 (both are recommended)

In-depth Laboratory

CHE-335: Adv Analytical Chemistry Lab (4.00)

This laboratory course is a hands-on experimental experience investigating an original chemical analysis problem using a number of instrumental methods. The problems may be chemical, environmental, or biochemical in nature depending on student interests. Students will identify a scientific question, and formulate an experimental design and conduct experiments utilizing two or more departmental instruments such as the NMR, FTIR, GC, GC-MS, HPLC, FAAS. Students will also gain experience on obtaining and preparing samples, analyzing and interpreting data, and drawing valid conclusions based on experimental results. Cross-listed with PH-335.

Course requisites: CHE-230 (pre-req) CHE-330 (co-req) Take CHE-330

CHE-365: Physical Chemistry Lab (4.00)

This is an in-depth laboratory based course that will allow students to study key experimental physical chemistry concepts, gain experience with equipment and instrumentation used in physical chemistry research, and increase their understanding of fundamental physical chemistry topics through hands-on experiments. Topics will span the fields of thermodynamics, kinetics and quantum mechanics and students will use a variety of scientific instruments and equipment. A significant amount of time will also be spent on data analysis and calculations.

Course requisites: CHE-150/150L, CHE-220/220L, and MAT-119 (or 119 equivalent)

CHE-375: Modern Inorganic Chemistry Lab (4.00)

This in-depth lab course focuses on the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds and the correlation of structures with contemporary crystal field and ligand field theories. Target molecules will include examples of cluster structures such as organotransition metal metallocarboranes and their precursors along with traditional transition metal complexes. Synthesis techniques will focus on oxygen-free and microscale reactions. Students will prepare publication-ready lab reports that include budgetary and safety discussions.

Course requisites: CHE-370 (taken previously or concurrently)

Research Requirement

Students must obtain a total of 4 credits from work done in CHE-440 and/or CHE-450 experiences. In order for these credits to satisfy the research requirement, the CHE-440/450 courses must consist of chemistry laboratory research plus a detailed report at the conclusion of each experience.

CHE-440: Directed Research (4.00)

Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to a particular field of intellectual or artistic interest, or to non-majors who demonstrate sufficient preparation in the discipline. Applications are available in the Office of Academic Advising and must be returned to the assistant dean of the college for approval. A 440 course carries 4 semester hours of credit.

CHE-450: Credit Internship (4.00)

For juniors and seniors who want a more-focused academic component to accompany their internship, the independently designed 450 may be an option. Students must identify a faculty sponsor and complete detailed paperwork for approval from the Office of Internship and Career Development.

Courses Required Outside of the Discipline

  • Mathematics 119 (or equivalent)
  • Physics 102 and 103 - OR - Physics 202 and 203

MAT-119: Calculus II (4.00)

Continuation of 118. Topics include the integral and its applications, techniques of integration, improper integrals and an introduction to series and differential equations.

Course requisites: 118 with a minimum grade of C-

PHY-102: Elements of Physics I/Lab (4.00)

Quantitative discussion of physical phenomena. Knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required. This course does not count toward a major or minor in physics or astrophysics. Students planning to major or minor in physics or astrophysics should take Physics 202-203. Physics 102/Lab satisfies the lab science distribution requirement. Credit cannot be received for both PHY-102 and PHY-202. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

PHY-103: Elements of Physics II/Lab (4.00)

ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS II/LAB--Continuation of Physics 102/Lab. Credit cannot be received for both PHY 103 and PHY 203. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: Prerequisite PHY-102

PHY-202: Intro Physics I/Lab: Mechanics (4.00)

A calculus-based course with laboratory covering Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, and other classical physics topics. Credit cannot be received for both PHY-102 and 202. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: Prereq MAT-118; Pre- or coreq MAT-119 Corequisite MAT-119

PHY-203: Intro Phys II/Lab: Electricity and Magnetism (4.00)

A calculus-based course with laboratory covering Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, and other classical physics topics. Credit cannot be received for both PHY-102 and PHY 202. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: PHY-202 (grade C- or higher) and MAT-119

Requirements for the Chemistry Minor

Minimum of 16 credits beyond 150 and 150L.  Students majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology cannot minor in chemistry.

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