Courses & Requirements

Requirements for the Biology Major

40 credits minimum in biology excluding 100, 108, 150, and 380.

Required Core Courses

Biology 110/110L, 111/111L; BIO-491 (4 credits) or approved research experience.

Chemistry 150/150L, and two of the following Chemistry courses 220/220L, 230, 240/240L, 300/300L.

Mathematics 115; and 117, 118 or 119.

BIO-110: Integrative Biology I (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function as they relate to ecology, evolution and genetics. Inquiry-based approaches to problem solving in science. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & BIO-110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-110L: Integrative Biology I LAB (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-110; must be taken concurrently with BIO-110.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & 110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111: Integrative Biology II (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function using one or more current problems such as addiction and cancer as a central theme. Molecular, cellular and organismal biology and the relationship of biological issues to science and society. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: Req'd prereqs: BIO-110 & 110L; req'd coreq 111L BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111L: Integrative Biology II Lab (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-111; must be taken concurrently with BIO-111.

Course requisites: BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-491: Senior Seminar in Integrative Biology (4.00)

Integrative experience for senior biology majors. Connects knowledge and skills with current interdisciplinary topics in biology. Involves primary literature study and analysis that result in written and oral products. Taught by two members of the biology faculty. Topic depends on the interface of the instructors' expertise and includes: Ecoimmunology, Microbial Ecology, Evolution and Development, Environmental Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Genetics/Genomics, Neurobiology and Behavior, Developmental Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics, Ecology/Evolution of Infectious Diseases, Conservation Genetics.

Course requisites: Senior Biology majors or permission of instructors.

CHE-150: Introduction to Chemistry (3.00)

This course delves into the world of atoms and molecules in order to study the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes. The course will provide an introduction to the field of chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, acids and bases, enthalpy, and equilibrium. In addition, contemporary problems and applications of these topics may be explored. Examples may include atomic and molecular structure relevant to the design of new material such as memory metals; stoichiometry as a means of achieving green chemistry; acids and bases in the context of biochemical and environmental reactions; enthalpy in the context of energy generating fuels; and equilibrium and its role in energy storing batteries.

Course requisites: Take CHE-150L

CHE-150L: Intro Basic Chemical Lab Techniques (1.00)

This lab course focuses on the experimental methods in basic scientific measurements, elementary reactions and analysis arranged around a theme such as forensics or the environment.

Course requisites: CHE-150 prereq or coreq for CHE-150L

CHE-220: Foundations of Inorganic & Physical Chem (3.00)

This foundation course focuses on introductory aspects of inorganic and physical chemistry. Topics may include fundamental chemical reactions, nuclear structure and radioactivity, molecular shapes, trends as seen in the periodic table, equilibrium, gas laws, molecular collision theory, the laws of thermodynamics, phases, reaction rates and reaction mechanisms. To illustrate the role of chemistry in fundamental physical and chemical behaviors, examples are chosen from a variety of areas including environmental, medical, and forensic applications.

Course requisites: CHE-150 and CHE-150L, minimum grade C- Take CHE-220L

CHE-220L: Foundation Inorganic & Physical Chem Lab (1.00)

Labs introduce students to the analysis and interpretation of observations. This course will also illustrate fundamental principals of chemistry including: reactivity of main group and transition metals; bonding and its relation to behavior; solution behavior; gas laws; heat capacity and enthalpy changes; and kinetics of reactions.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-220

CHE-230: Analytical Chemistry I (4.00)

This foundational course centers on quantitative chemical analysis. Students will study chemical equilibria including acid base chemistry, buffers, and solubility as well as various methods used to measure chemical species in solution such as titrimetry, electrochemistry, absorption, spectroscopy, and chromatography.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L;

CHE-240: Organic Chemistry I (3.00)

The systematic study of the chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on theories of structure and reactivity. Specific topics include basic organic molecular structure and bonding, isomerism, stereochemistry, molecular energetics, substitution and elimination reactions, and reactions of biologically relevant functional groups.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240L

CHE-240L: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1.00)

Introduction to fundamental experimental techniques of carbon based molecules, including organic synthesis, purification and separation techniques, and theory and interpretation of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Course requisites: CHE-150 CHE-150L; Take CHE-240

CHE-300: Introduction to Biochemistry/Lab (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways and regulation of biochemical processes. Fundamental biochemical laboratory techniques including spectroscopy, enzymology, chromatographic separations, and protein detection methods. Cross-listed with BIO-300.

Course requisites: CHE-240 & 240L (BIO-110/L & 111/L also prereqs for BIO mjrs)

MAT-115: Elementary Statistics (4.00)

Statistical measures and distributions, probability and its application to statistical inference, linear correlation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and applications in the natural and social sciences.

MAT-117: Functions and Modeling (4.00)

A study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, and their applications and use in modeling real-world situations in the natural and social sciences. Functions are studied from numerical, graphical and algebraic viewpoints. Emphasis on conceptual understanding and problem solving.

MAT-118: Calculus I (4.00)

Introduction to the basic concepts of differential and integral calculus, emphasizing conceptual understanding and applications. Topics are covered from a graphical, algebraic and numerical perspective. Mathematical writing is emphasized.

MAT-119: Calculus II (4.00)

Continuation of 118. Topics include the integral and its applications, techniques of integration, improper integrals and an introduction to series and differential equations.

Course requisites: 118 with a minimum grade of C-

Required Breadth Courses

Choose at least one course from each of the following groups:

Group I: Organismal

BIO-201: Microbiology/Lab (4.00)

Cell biology, metabolism, genetics and phylogeny of bacteria and archaea. Introduction to eukaryotic microbes and viruses. Principles of pathogenesis, immunology and environmental microbiology. Applications in biotechnology, medicine and industry. Individual laboratory project and use of representative literature in the discipline. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111

BIO-222: Human Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab (4.00)

Covers the basics of human anatomy and physiology including anatomical terminology, cells and tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110/Lab and BIO-111/Lab

BIO-223: Human Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab (4.00)

Covers the basics of human anatomy and physiology including the lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Introduces common human disease processes. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-222 (Human Anat & Phys I)

BIO-240: Vertebrate Biology/Lab (4.00)

Morphology of the vertebrate body and evolution of vertebrate groups. Comparative anatomy and histology. Includes dissection of selected animals. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111

BIO-270: Invertebrate Biology/Lab (4.00)

Comparative anatomy, functional morphology, systematics and evolution of major and minor invertebrate phyla to achieve an understanding of unity, diversity and evolution in these animals. Laboratory includes some fieldwork. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-192 Prerequisite

BIO-351: Foundations of Neuroscience II (3.00)

This course requires students to understand the basics of the nervous system at the systems level and equips students with scientific tools such as critical analysis of primary literature, development of an inquiry based project, and presentation of scientific research. Cross-listed with PSY-351.

Course requisites: BIO-351 & BIO-351L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-351L: Inquiry Based Research Neurosci II Lab (1.00)

INQUIRY BASED RESEARCH IN NEUROSCIENCE II LAB--In this laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-351, students are given background material and generate their own line of scientific inquiry with tools and specific techniques explained and taught. Based on their questions and the techniques available, they will design experiments and analyze the results.

Course requisites: BIO-351 & 351L must be taken concurrently.

Group II: Ecology and Evolution

BIO-215: Marine Biology (4.00)

Ecological approach to the study of marine organisms as exemplified in temperate, semi-tropical and tropical environments. A three-week field course in the summer is one component of this course; dates to be determined. Limited to eight students. Prerequisite: One biology course and instructor permission.

Course requisites: One course in biology and permission of the instructor

BIO-230: Evolutionary Biology (4.00)

Processes and patterns of adaptation and speciation. Population genetics and population biology as they relate to evolutionary biology.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111

BIO-308: Ecology/Lab (4.00)

Interactions of organisms with their abiotic and biotic environments. Populations, communities and ecosystems from ecological and environmental perspectives. Laboratory and field studies, environmental analysis. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110, 111 & one 200-level BIO course; BIO-108 is prereq for ESS minors; Mathematics 117, 118 or 119 recommended

BIO-308L: Ecology Lab (0.00)

Course requisites: Take BIO-308

BIO-310: Behavioral Ecology/Lab (4.00)

The study of the origins, causes, and functions of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Inquiry-driven lab research emphasizes experimental design, analysis, and communication of quantitative tests of hypotheses carried out in the lab and the field. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111

BIO-311: Disease Ecology (4.00)

Hosts, pathogens, and vectors are parts of complex ecosystems. In order to understand the impacts of disease, this course will examine the effects of disease on ecosystems (including humans) and explore the ecological and evolutionary processes that drive disease dynamics.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111 - OR - PH-101 and PH-211

Group III: Cellular and Molecular Biology

BIO-216: Molecular Biology (3.00)

Genes and their activities at the molecular level in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation in health and disease. Advanced topics in genetic engineering and biotechnology. Emphasis on experimental strategies and data analysis. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and BIO-111 BIO-216 & BIO-216L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-216L: Inquiry-Based Research Molecul Bio/Lab (1.00)

One-credit inquiry-based research experience/laboratory corequisite course to BIO-216 Molecular Biology.

Course requisites: BIO-216 & 216L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-220: Genetics/Lab (4.00)

Structure, function, regulation and transmission of hereditary materials in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110 and 111

BIO-300: Biochemistry I/Lab (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways, signal transduction and regulation of biochemical processes (lecture plus lab). Fundamental biochemical laboratory methods including the study of acid-base properties of amino acids and proteins, spectro-photometric characterization, chromatographic separation techniques and electrophoresis. Cross-listed with CHE-300.

Course requisites: CHE-240 & 240L (BIO-110/L & 111/L also prereqs for BIO mjrs)

BIO-309: Cells & Tissues/Lab (4.00)

Structure and function of eukaryotic cells as entities and as components of tissues. Laboratory to include the study of cell and tissue types using standard and advanced microscopic methods and microtechnique. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & one 200-level BIO course

BIO-309L: Cells and Tissues Laboratory (0.00)

Course requisites: Take BIO-309

BIO-317: Immunology/Lab (4.00)

Study of mammalian immune system at cellular and molecular level. Topics include: recognition of antigen, development of lymphocyte repertoire, innate and adaptive immune responses, and immune disorders such as autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. 3 LEC, 1 LAB.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & one 200-level BIO course

BIO-318: Developmental Biology/Lab (4.00)

Morphological patterns and developmental mechanisms in the ontogeny of animals. The role of development in the evolution of animal forms. Emphasis on classical vertebrate and invertebrate models.

Course requisites: BIO-192 and CHE-150

BIO-350: Foundations of Neuroscience I (3.00)

This course requires students to understand the basics of the nervous system at the cellular and subcellular level as well as equip students with scientific tools such as critical analysis of primary literature, development of an inquiry based project, and presentation of scientific research. Cross-listed with PSY-350.

Course requisites: BIO-350 & BIO-350L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-350L: Inquiry Based Research Neuroscience Lab (1.00)

INQUIRY BASED RESEARCH IN NEUROSCIENCE LAB--In this laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-350, students are given background material and generate their own line of scientific inquiry with tools and specific techniques explained and taught. Based on their questions and the techniques available, they will design experiments and analyze the results.

Course requisites: BIO-350 & 350L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-385: Advanced Biochem & Molecular Biology (4.00)

Advanced, project-based interdisciplinary course involving laboratory research and analysis of primary literature in the fields of biochemistry and molecular biology. Cross-listed with CHE-385.

Course requisites: BIO-216 or CHE-300 (both are recommended)

Additional Requirements

Four additional biology courses.

BIO-260: Bioinformatics (4.00)

An introduction to the theory and practice of bioinformatics and computational biology. Topics include: the analysis of genome sequences, comparative genomics, gene expression arrays, and proteomics. As part of this course, students carry out original, independent, computer-based bioinformatics research by annotating portions of newly sequenced genomes.

Course requisites: BIO-110, BIO-111 & MAT-115 (or higher math course)

BIO-285: Animal Behavior (4.00)

Development, ecology and causation of animal behavior. Emphasis on comparative analysis of mechanisms underlying the production of species-specific behavior. 3 LEC, 1 LAB. Cross-listed with PSY-285.

Course requisites: BIO-111 (or 192) or PSY-101

BIO-296: Topics in Neuroscience (4.00)

New technologies emerging from neuroscience such as designer drugs, MRI use as lie-detector, and gene therapy for neural disorders. Examination of the basic science behind these and other technologies as well as important social, political, and ethical implications. May not be used to fulfill minimum requirements for the biology major. May be used as elective credit in the psychology major. Cross-listed with PSY-296.

Course requisites: BIO-110, PSY-101 or PSY-102 (1 course)

BIO-301: Medical Biochemistry (4.00)

Fundamentals of biochemistry topics with clinical significance for pre-medical students, including structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, catabolic and anabolic pathways and regulation of biochemical processes. Does not include a lab component. Cross-listed with CHE-301.

Course requisites: BIO-111/L and CHE-240/L

BIO-303: Data Intensive Ecology/Lab (4.00)

This is a course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) in ecological research, data analysis, and computational methods. Students will gain hands-on experience using multiple publicly available ecological data sets to generate their own authentic research questions in the fields of behavioral ecology, community ecology, biodiversity, conservation, and sustainability. Students will be exposed to and gain experience using R, Python, and spatial analysis software while completing and presenting a semester-long group research project.

Course requisites: BIO-110, 110L, 111 and 111L

BIO-324: Neuroendocrinology (4.00)

The course provides comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of the inter-relationship between the nervous and endocrine systems in mammals. Topics covered include endocrine regulation of reproductive behavior, aggressive behavior, biological rhythms, energy balance, stress, and learning and memory. Cross-listed with PSY-324.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & 111 (& labs)

BIO-325: Addiction (4.00)

This is a course about addiction to drugs and other behaviors. General topics will include cellular and molecular foundations of neuropharmacology, receptors, and modulation of neural signaling. In addition, we will discuss other topics such as government policy and susceptibility to addiction. Cross-listed with PSY-325.

Course requisites: BIO-110, 111 & one 200-level BIO course; CHE-150 recommended

BIO-330: Diseases of the Nervous System (4.00)

This course examines the cell types that make up the human brain and how the cells function properly to make us who we are. We will examine the sub-cellular nature of different diseases to understand how brain cells function.

Course requisites: BIO-110, 111 & one 200-lev BIO crs (216 or 220 recommended)

Requirements for the Biology Minor

Biology 110/110L, 111/111L, and three additional courses at the 200 level or above.

Required Courses

BIO-110: Integrative Biology I (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function as they relate to ecology, evolution and genetics. Inquiry-based approaches to problem solving in science. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & BIO-110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-110L: Integrative Biology I LAB (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-110; must be taken concurrently with BIO-110.

Course requisites: BIO-110 & 110L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111: Integrative Biology II (3.00)

An integrated study of biological form and function using one or more current problems such as addiction and cancer as a central theme. Molecular, cellular and organismal biology and the relationship of biological issues to science and society. Lecture, 3 credits.

Course requisites: Req'd prereqs: BIO-110 & 110L; req'd coreq 111L BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

BIO-111L: Integrative Biology II Lab (1.00)

Laboratory co-requisite course to BIO-111; must be taken concurrently with BIO-111.

Course requisites: BIO-111 & 111L must be taken concurrently.

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