Courses

The film and media studies program at Agnes Scott offers students the opportunity to concentrate on film as an art and as a means of expression. Within the minor the student will examine the narrative dimensions of film as well as the unique vocabulary and language of film technique. The program also focuses on film theory and film history as well as the ideological, social and cultural implications of film discourse. The program additionally offers courses focusing on the analysis of other media and popular culture. Drawing its courses from across the curriculum, the program emphasizes interdisciplinary learning, allowing students to synthesize their study of film and media through a number of perspectives: English, art, theatre, history, languages, political science, sociology, anthropology, religion, music, and philosophy.

Courses

ENG-230 TOPICS IN FILM STUDY (4)
(Cross-listed with WS-229 when topic applies)

ENG-230A: FILM AS ART: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (4)
This course will focus on the basics of film as an art. Fundamental elements of film, such as editing, sound, cinematography, and mise-en-scene will be explored in relation to the particular storytelling power of films. Emphasis will also be placed on the nature of narrative form in film. Attention will also be paid to the ideological dimension of film and to selected issues in film history and theory. Films for analysis will be drawn from both Hollywood and international cinemas. Special Unit on Irish Film for Global Awareness: Ireland when scheduled.

ENG-230B: WORLDS IN A FRAME: AN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY OF FILM (4)
Film has been one of the most influential art forms since its inception over one hundred years ago. To study the history of film is to understand how film form and technique have been established and transformed over time. This course will focus on key moments in the development of cinema such as German Impressionism, Russian Montage, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and the Hollywood Renaissance. We will study as test cases the work of such major world film directors as Griffith, Eisenstein, Welles, Hitchcock, Truffaut, and Kar-wai.

ENG-310 IMAGINING KING ARTHUR IN LITERATURE AND FILM 1136 TO 2004 (4)
Through discussion of literary texts from the twelfth century through the twentieth, students will encounter the ways the legend was molded to the time in which it was told, and they will also discern the vexed thematic strands that seem to persist in each retelling. Alongside most readings, students will view a related film, and they will reflect on how these films negotiate their intertwining relationships with their informing works of literature, their own particular historical moments, their transpositions of subject matter from one artistic medium to another, and the history of cinematic adaptations of Arthurian legend.

ENG-325B: AFRICAN AMERICAN FICTION AND FILM (4)
The African American novel has proven to be a vibrant and resilient form, giving expression to the experiences and concerns of black people for more than 150 years. Through the representational potentialities provided by fiction, black writers have given witness and testimony to a people’s quest for freedom, identity, justice, and equality. A primary category of analysis will be gender, as the reading list will consist of paired texts by female and male writers. A special film component will be available for film studies credit.

ENG-360A FILM AND FASHION (4)
This course will explore the relationship between film and fashion: how the film medium and film culture further the agendas of the fashion industry and how fashion as a category of meaning shapes film narratives.

ENG-360B FICTION INTO FILM (4)
This course will explore the relationship between narrative in fiction and film: both the formal differences between literature and film and how both forms of narrative simultaneously shape and reflect their cultures.

FRE-345 FRENCH LITERATURE AND GENRE (4)
Prose, poetry and theatre will be considered either individually or in relation to one another.
Prerequisite: FRE-230, one 200-level literature course

FRE-375 FRENCH FILM (4)
Topics in French cinema from avant-garde to the present, with an introduction to film theory. Screenplays may also be studied.
Prerequisite: FRE-230, one 200-level literature course

GER-330 TOPICS IN GERMAN FILM (4)
Survey of selected historical, formal, and aesthetic developments in German cinema from silent films to the present, including topics such as mountain films, propaganda and feature films of the National Socialist period, and auteur films. Taught in English. May retake for credit with permission of the department.

HIS-217 HISTORY ON FILM: CINEMATIC EXPLORATIONS OF THE EUROPEAN PAST (4)
This course introduces students to the representation of history on film. With a focus on European history, students will analyze how filmmakers and others interpret social, political and cultural events.

HIS-354 CHINESE WOMEN ON FILM: HISTORY AND THE CINEMATIC IMAGINATION (4)
This course examines the history of women and gender in China as depicted in film. Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which modernization, imperialism, and globalization have shaped women’s roles and representations of women throughout the 20th century.
(Cross-listed with WS-354)

HIS-360 WORLD WAR II IN ASIA ON FILM (4)
This course explores the history of World War II in Asia, especially as (re)presented and remembered in films. Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural aspects of World War II and to how films shape the collective memory of different Asian countries and the United States.

POL-317 POLITICS OF THE MASS MEDIA (4)
The role of mass media in political life, including the structure and decision-making processes of the media, the interaction of the media with government and other institutions, the impact of mass media in elections and public policies affecting the media. Prerequisite: one 100-level course, POL-201 strongly recommended

POL-375 CORPORATIONS, MEDIA, AND DEMOCRACY (4)
Examination of structures, functions, and governance of corporations, including legal personhood, emphasizing roles of corporations in political life, especially corporate funding and influence in campaign finance, mass media, and think thanks and universities. Alternative governance approaches will be considered.

REL-233 TIBET THROUGH FILM AND LITERATURE (4)
This course examines the construction of Tibet as a mythic object of fantasy in the Western imagination. Close attention will be given to the way Tibet has been portrayed in a variety of literary and film genres.

REL-235 JESUS IN HISTORY AND CULTURE (4)
An examination of the quest for the historical Jesus, with an analysis of literary and cultural sources (especially from film, music and art), and also the ethical implications of Jesus’ life and message, from the 19th century to contemporary times.

REL-316 THE POLITICS OF THE APOCALYPSE (4)
An interdisciplinary course that includes biblical studies, politics, ethics, literary criticism, philosophical and critical theory, social movements, history, art, music, dance, and film studies. We will consider the apocalyptic imagination and representations in religion, politics, and culture.
Prerequisite: one course in religious studies

SOC-370 AFRICAN AMERICAN IMAGES IN POPULAR CULTURE (4)
Emphasis given to the influence of race on U.S. culture and the interplay of race and culture with politics.
Prerequisite: SOC-101 or ANT-101
(Cross-listed with AS-370, WS-395)

SPA-380/480 INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO HISPANIC LITERATURES AND CULTURES (SPA-480 TOPICS IN HISPANIC THEMES) (4)
Examination of selected aspects of the cultures of Spain and/or Latin America through the study of literature, film, mass media, social institutions and movements. May be repeated for credit when the instructor changes.
Prerequisite: SPA-323

THE-303 DRAMATIC WRITING II (4)
Principles of the craft of the screenwriter with an emphasis on film structure and format through reading of screenplays and writing of a feature-length scenario.
Prerequisite: THE-203 or THE-205 (if in dramatic writing)
(Cross-listed with ENG-303)

THE/ENG-304 DRAMATIC WRITING III (4)
Principles of the craft of writing for television through the lens of the situation comedy, from the development of the pilot script through the assembly of a writing staff to the creation of an additional episode.