Off Campus

Students are encouraged to explore opportunities to do research off campus, especially during the summer months. Every year, we post opportunities for summer research, but student should also pursue this on their own and search for research projects that interest them.  Look for opportunities on the bulletin board by the labs!

Another great resource for summer research opportunities can be found at The Nucleus, an online resource for undergraduate in Physics & Astronomy.

Student research done in the past:

brynn presler marshall photoBrynn Presler-Marshall (Astrophysics ‘19) - was an REU student at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. She worked with the Planetary Radar group to study the surface features of a collection of near-Earth asteroids, and will be presenting her work at the DPS meeting in October

 

 

 

 

 

 


Emma Shaw photoEmma Shaw (Physics '20) - spent this summer at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, IA studying musical acoustics with Dr. James Cottingham. Her research  focused on air flow in Helmholtz resonators and free reed instruments. She says, “We specifically looked at how air flow affected higher modes of frequency and oscillation patterns using FFT analysis”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 Kimberly Patterson (Astrophysics ‘20) - spent this summer participating in  an REU at the College of Wooster in Ohio studying the trajectories of movement on a theoretical cuboid shaped planet. When she wasn’t busy in the lab, she also gave a short physics demonstration on polarization for the camp BWISER, which aims to keep young girls interested in science and physics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ruoyi Wang (Physics ‘20) - worked with Dr. Koch on a math conjecture about central binomial coefficient and its small prime divisor.  Later they branched off into looking at the base-3 expansion of 2k where k is an integer. They came up with a graph that was able to predict some the ternary expansion of some 2k without calculating it but not enough to solve the conjecture.  

                        

 

 

 

 

 

Abigail Harden photo

 Abigail Harden (Astrophysics and Mathematics ‘21) - participated in a heliophysics REU cohosted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). She worked with several MSFC scientists on a project titled ‘The Cause of Faint Coronal Jets from Emerging-Flux Regions in Coronal Holes’.  She will be presenting this work at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in December.