Summer School Courses

SUMMER SESSION I (May 31-June 30, 2016)

ART-144/244: Visual Thinking-Digital/Digital Processes combined course (on campus)
Instructor:Nell Ruby
This course employs digital technology to study and explore the form and technique of design and drawing through the close examination of line, color and texture in relation to problems in composition, color theory, subject matter and space. Emphasis is on the design process and conceptual development. Media will span a range of materials and technology, but will be primarily based on the use of digital tools to see and express through mediating traditional art materials. The course will rotate between a traditional drawing studio where we will use charcoal and easels, to a Macintosh computer lab where we will use wacom tablets, and the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator etc.). For students taking 244, we will use software standard to the creative industry as a tool to explore typography, photography, illustration, and time-based imagery. Projects are conceptually based and focus on experimenting with direct hand work, digital effects and various modes of presentation. We will emphasize understanding reading and designing meaning and message in visual expression.

AST-120/120L: The Solar System, with lab (online)
Instructor: Paul Wallace
A survey of the solar system, including the planets, minor bodies and the sun. An overview of orbital motion, the properties of light and fundamentals of astronomical instrumentation. Includes a required laboratory component in which students learn introductory observational methods, including telescope alignment and calibration and visual, photographic and CCD observations of the sun, the moon, planets and stars.

CHI-101: Elementary Chinese I (online)
Instructor: Jing Paul
Designed to make spoken and written Mandarin Chinese a functional language for students. Emphasis on pronunciation, basic vocabulary, foundational grammar for simple sentences and short paragraphs, and the Chinese writing system for rudimentary reading and writing.

DAN-315: Choreography I (on campus)
Instructor: Bridget Roosa
Exploration of skills and techniques necessary for students to develop dance compositions.

ENG-230: Topics in Film Study: Romantic Comedy (online)
Instructor: Willie Tolliver
This course will study some of these classic as well as modern and contemporary examples in relation to film history, historical contexts. film technique, and social/cultural ideologies. Specific emphasis will be placed on defining the genre and its subgenres, delineating its salient characteristics, tracing the development of the genre to the present, and understanding how stars and directors contribute to the genre. In addition, attention will be paid to basic film aesthetics and film narrative theory.

FRE-201: Intermediate French I (online)
Instructor: Julia Knowlton
Grammar review, oral and written comprehension, reading and composition.

MAT-115: Elementary Statistics (online)
Instructor: Alan Koch
Statistical measures and distributions, probability and its application to statistical inference, linear correlation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and applications in the natural and social sciences. A scientific calculator is required for this course.

PSY-101: Introductory Psychology: Biological Foundation and Cognitive Processes (online)
Instructor: Bonnie Perdue
This is one-half of a two-semester introduction to psychology. The course is about the nervous system as it pertains to behavior and cognition. Students may take PSY-101 or PSY-102 first and each course is independent of the other.

WS-100: Introduction to Women's Studies (online)
Instructor: Kelly Ball
Using feminist perspectives and scholarship, this interdisciplinary course examines the experiences of women in the United States, analyzes institutions and practices that affect women and develops connections to women in other cultures.

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SUMMER SESSION II (July 5-Aug 4, 2016)

ANT-101: Cultural Anthropology (online)
Instructor: Martha Rees
Overview of cultural universals and cultural diversity, using comparative analysis of African, American, Asian and other cultures. Examination of the impact of contact between cultures and the contemporary condition of indigenous peoples, using case studies (ethnographies), ethnographic film and class activities.

ART-144/244/344: Visual Thinking-Digital/Digital Processes/Digital Processes Advanced combined course (on campus)
Instructor:Nell Ruby
This course employs digital technology to study and explore the form and technique of design and drawing through the close examination of line, color and texture in relation to problems in composition, color theory, subject matter and space. Emphasis is on the design process and conceptual development. Media will span a range of materials and technology, but will be primarily based on the use of digital tools to see and express through mediating traditional art materials. The course will rotate between a traditional drawing studio where we will use charcoal and easels, to a Macintosh computer lab where we will use wacom tablets, and the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator etc.). For students taking 244, we will use software standard to the creative industry as a tool to explore typography, photography, illustration, and time-based imagery. Projects are conceptually based and focus on experimenting with direct hand work, digital effects and various modes of presentation. We will emphasize understanding reading and designing meaning and message in visual expression. For students taking 344, the course focuses on individual design problems. Advanced projects are student designed, and emphasize conceptual strength, advanced technique and aesthetic and oral presentation.

CHI-102: Elementary Chinese II (online)
Instructor: Jing Paul
Designed to make spoken and written Mandarin Chinese a functional language for students. Emphasis on pronunciation, basic vocabulary, foundational grammar for simple sentences and short paragraphs, and the Chinese writing system for rudimentary reading and writing. A continuation of CHI-101.

EDU/ENG-320: Literature for Children and Young Adults (online)
Instructor: Toby Emert
In-depth examination of the themes that permeate current offerings from the world of publishing for children and young adults; emphasis on the following topics: literary theory, cultural representation, censorship issues, aesthetics, bibliotherapy, and pedagogical implications.

FRE-202: Intermediate French II (online)
Instructor: Philip Ojo
Grammar review, oral and written comprehension, reading and composition.

FRE-232: French/Francophone Civilization and Culture (online)
Instructor: Julia Knowlton
Course content will focus on the relationships between sociopolitical change and artistic expression in France and in the Francophone world. Emphasis will be placed on historical development, post-colonial identities, and contemporary cultures. Taught in English.

HIS-101: Europe from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (online)
Instructor: Yael Manes
European society and culture from the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment including: marriage and family, religion and religious reform, women and gender, popular and elite culture, science and medicine and interaction with world cultures and state building.

PSY-102: Introductory Psychology: Development, Social Behavior, and Individual Differences (online)
Instructor: Carrie Brown
This is one-half of a two-semester introduction to psychology. This course will cover topics such as social psychology, development, personality, and psychopathology. Students may take PSY-101 or PSY-102 first and each course is independent of the other.

PSY-200: Developmental Psychology (online)
Instructor: Carrie Brown
Development of the individual throughout the lifespan. Prerequisite - PSY-101 or -102.

WS/PH-225: Issues in Women's Health (online)
Instructor: Kelly Ball
The purpose of this course is to examine topics in women’s health in the United States; the programs, services, and policies that affect women’s health; and methodological issues in research about women’s health. The course content will emphasize the social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors associated with women’s health. We will consider how axes of difference such as gender, race, class, sexuality, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care. The epidemiology, measurement and interpretation of these factors, and how these factors can be translated into interventions, programs, and policy, will be of major interest. *The course surveys a broad topic area. Because some topics will not be covered in depth and some topics may not be covered at all, the assignments are intended to encourage students to examine topics that of interest to their studies.