Courses

A student majoring in English takes courses emphasizing both breadth and depth of knowledge and addressing a variety of literary periods and genres. She may compose her program with a specific focus in mind, or she may aim at a broad and balanced course of literary study. A student may also plan a program of concentrated study in which she emphasizes her major interests in literature and chooses related courses from other disciplines (for example, medieval studies or American studies). English majors may participate in both credit and noncredit internships, in faculty-led Global Awareness programs, or in any other college-approved study-abroad program.  

Course Listing:
ENG-110 THE CRAFT OF WRITING (4)
With literature as a context, this course engages students in critical inquiry through reading, discussion, oral presentations, and writing, emphasizing an in-depth exploration of the writing process from generating ideas to polishing the final draft. Students will learn to analyze texts; develop a significant and focused controlling idea; construct well-organized paragraphs to advance the argument or narrative; use sources effectively; and write and speak with clarity, creativity, and eloquence. They will write and revise frequently and will receive regular commentary on their writing.

ENG-210 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (4)
Expository writing for the student who wishes to develop and refine her use of language and her understanding of the writing process. Emphasis on forms of academic discourse, revision and research writing. Students will write several kinds of academic essays using topics of their devising. The mechanics of effective revision will be the focus of the course.
Prerequisite: ENG-110

English Literature
Prerequisites:
For 200-level literature courses, the prerequisite is ENG-110 or the equivalent, including exemption. For 300-level literature courses, the prerequisite is any 200-level English course (literature or creative writing) or permission of chair.

ENG-211 EARLY BRITISH LITERATURE (4)
The first thousand years of literature in Britain. The course covers Old English heroic tradition, chivalric romance, medieval satire, medieval and renaissance lyric and drama, and the early modern epic. Readings include such authors as the Beowulf and Gawain poets, Marie de France, Geoffrey Chaucer, Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Sir Philip Sidney, Lady Mary Wroth, William Shakespeare, John Donne, and John Milton.
Counts toward pre-1800 requirement

ENG-212 BRITISH LITERATURE SINCE 1700  (4)
A survey of multiple forms of British literature written after the Renaissance. We begin with a mock epic, a satiric travel narrative, and an ex-slave’s autobiography—all from the eighteenth century. Nineteenth-century literature is represented by several Romantic and Victorian poets as well as a novel by Dickens. The course concludes with a unit on Modernism and samples of postcolonial literature. Authors include Swift, Equiano, Wordsworth, Browning, Yeats, Woolf, Auden, Beckett, and Gordimer.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement

ENG-213 TRUE AMERICANS: AMERICAN WRITING 1600-1900  (4)
In a 1781 essay De Crevecoeur asked: “What is an American?” Throughout the semester, we will pursue answers to this question. This course is a chronological survey of American literature from its beginnings to the turn of the twentieth century with an emphasis on the formation of a national identity and literary tradition. Canonical and non-canonical works of prose, poetry and fiction will be read in their cultural, social and historical contexts as well as through multiple critical approaches and literary theories. Special attention will be paid to issues of race, ethnicity and gender.
Offered alternate years
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement

ENG-214 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1900-PRESENT (4)
Surveying literary movements and their cultural contexts in the United States since 1900, students read across genres to learn about American experiences as they are represented in literary and artistic movements like Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. We will examine the contextual and historical moments in which these movements parallel developments in industrialization and technology, immigration policies, civil and women’s rights, military conflicts, theories of multiculturalism, and the rise of digital culture in order to interrogate our national literary tradition.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-215 LITERATURE OF IRELAND (4)
As a site of constant invasion and as “England’s first colony and her last,” Ireland has engaged the struggle for national and cultural identity in its literature from the earliest texts (myths, monastic and bardic poetry, ballads) to the satirical works of Jonathan Swift, the Celtic Revival led by Yeats and Gregory, the Gaelic language movement, the postcolonial subjects and arguments of Irish modernism, representations of The Troubles, and the cross-border, cross-boundary perspectives of contemporary literature. We will explore these and related themes in works by Swift, Edgeworth, Synge, Yeats, Gregory, O’Crohan, O’Casey, Kavanagh, Macneice, Deane, Friel, Heaney, Boland, Carr, and others.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement

ENG-216 TOPICS IN BLACK WRITING (4)
Exploration of the varieties of American and international black writing across literary periods (for example, Black Women Writers or The Literature of the African Diaspora). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-216 when topic applies and AS-216)

ENG-216A: WOMEN WRITERS OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA (4)
This course will connect recent works from the rich body of literature produced by black women since 1970 to earlier writing by their predecessors. The scope of this survey will range from literary responses to the experience of slavery to contemporary explorations of the black female presence on the global stage. The writers to be scrutinized will include such writers as Wilson, Butler, Hopkins, Walker, Larsen, Jones, Shockley, Levy and Lee. Their works will be interpreted within their historical, social, cultural and aesthetic contexts.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-217 TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND EMPIRE  (4)
Exploration of themes of colonization and imperialism across periods and genres (for example, the Adventure Novel, Narratives of the Empire, Orientalist Texts and Contexts), focusing on cultural and social anxieties generated by the imperial project, the dynamics of domination and exploitation, the nature of constructed identities, and the dialectic of gender roles and relationships. Approved topics listed below.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-217 when topic applies)

ENG-217-A: NARRATIVES OF EMPIRE: EXPLORERS, ADVENTURERS, CHARLATANS, COLONIZERS (4)
Thieves and adventurers, pirates of the high seas and unscrupulous deceivers, wise old men, resourceful teenagers, horse-traders, spies; women, clever, witty, perspicacious; natives, sharp, skillful, and accomplished—a thrilling journey through the British Empire in the process of its formation, from the South Seas and Polynesia to Afghanistan and central India, from North Africa to the Belgian Congo, and the Sudan to southern Africa. Will explore dynamics of domination and exploitation, nature of constructed identities, the dialectic of gender roles and relationships. Texts may include works by Henty, Marrayat, Stevenson, Haggard, Schreiner, Kipling, Conrad, and Forster, among others, as well as films and documentaries.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-218 TOPICS IN ETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURES (4)
The study of works by members of ethnically defined groups (for example, Asian-American literature or Native-American literature). Approved topics listed below.

ENG-218A: COMPARATIVE ETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURE (4)
Whether as a “melting pot,” a “salad bowl,” or a “mosaic,” we know that America is composed of multicultural, multiethnic, and multilinguistic traditions. This course engages a comparative understanding of racialized communities in American literature, including literary productions by authors of African American, American Indian, Chicano/a, Asian American, and Hispanic American traditions. Through comparative analyses, we will regard how textual productions by Americans of different backgrounds understand and negotiate their participation in the development of American cultures.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-218B: AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE (4)
Literature by American Indian writers in cultural and political contexts. The course focuses on writers from the 1970s to the present but includes traditional narratives and nineteenth and early twentieth century authors. What does it mean to be an American writer? What cultural assumptions do we bring to our reading of literature? Readings include such figures as Zitkala Sa, Mourning Dove, James Welch, Simon Ortiz, Leslie Marmon Silko, Vine Deloria, Adrian C. Louis, Thomas King, Sherman Alexie, Joy Harjo, and Louise Erdrich.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-219 TOPICS IN LITERARY HISTORY (4)
Exploration of a literary issue, theme or form across literary periods (for example, Necessary Mythologies or The Gothic). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.

ENG-219A: GOTHIC LITERATURE (4)
In tracing the origin and progress of this genre we shall study works by several celebrated writers of gothic fiction, among them Horace Walpole, William Beckford, Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, Ann Radcliffe, Joseph Sheriden Le Fanu, Bram Stoker, and Shirley Jackson, and supplement our literary engagement with a look at some outstanding examples of the gothic in American cinema. To put it all in perspective we will read Fred Botting’s informative little book, Gothic, side by side with the novels, romances, and movies that are included in this course.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement

ENG-220 TOPICS IN WOMEN AND LITERATURE  (4)
Women as authors and subjects in literature. Gender as a central factor of analysis.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement depending on topic
(Cross-listed with WS-221 when topic applies)

ENG-221 DEVELOPMENTS IN THE NOVEL  (4)
Exploration of topics in the history of the novel across literary periods (for example, The Protest Novel or The Origins of the Novel). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-221A: FICTION AND SYMPATHY (4)
Whom do novels ask us to feel sympathy with, and why? How does sympathy affect moral judgment, skepticism, or irony? How might sympathy with fictional characters affect real-world opinions and actions? Authors include Gogol, Flaubert, Eliot, Woolf, and Ishiguro.

ENG-221B: SOCIAL FORCES IN THE DETECTIVE NOVEL (4)
The detective / crime / mystery / suspense novel in Britain and America, from the classic period of the 1920s and '30s to the present. The course will explore the implications of terms like popular, Art, pulp, crime, mystery, and detective; the approaches of popular fiction toward issues like race, gender, sexuality, ecology, and freedom of speech; and the relationship between the violence inherent in the genre and "the violence inherent in the system." Readings will include works by Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, Josephine Tey, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Georges Simenon, Chester Himes, Walter Mosley, Sara Paretsky, and Val McDermid

ENG-222 DEVELOPMENTS IN POETRY (4)
Exploration of topics in the history of poetry across literary periods (for example, Lyric Voices or The History of the Ballad). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.

ENG-222A: LYRIC POETRY (4)
How do poets draw on, depart from, and reinvent literary history? We will examine individual poets, groups like the Romantics and the Modernists, and topics across eras including love poetry and light verse. Readings 1800-present throughout the English-speaking world.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-223 DEVELOPMENTS IN DRAMA  (4)
Exploration of topics in the history of drama across literary periods (for example, Women Dramatists or Revenge Plays). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.

ENG-223B: BRITISH COMIC DRAMA (4)
An historical exploration of British comedy as the drama of disruption, misrule, romance, generosity, order, authority, and/or community. Readings include comic dramatizations of unlikely subjects such as the fall of Lucifer and the birth of Christ; pastoral and city comedies of the Renaissance; racy, witty plays of the late seventeenth-century; both sentimental and laughing comedies of the eighteenth-century; late nineteenth-century playwrights Wilde and Shaw; and modern variations on the comic by Beckett, Pinter, and Churchill.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-224 QUEER LITERATURE  (4)
Definitions of identity based on sexuality are relatively recent; in this course, we will survey the historical and social construction of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, and queer identities in literature. Situating texts into frames of literary, social, and cultural representations of queerness, we will historicize the development of non-heteronormative sexual and gender identities in an effort to illustrate that our contemporary ideas about sexuality and LGBTQ identities are informed by various academic disciplines, cultural influences, and political ideologies.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-218)

ENG-228 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND ITS DISCONTENTS (4)
English has been a tribal language, the language of a subject people under French rule, and a language of world empire. How is English shaped by its past? Where does it get its words and its rules? Where did "standard English" come from, and whose purposes does it serve? Who owns the language? How have social and literary movements (feminism, womanism, Black Arts, gay rights) resisted language authority? What forces are shaping the future of English in this country and in the world? In order to answer these questions, we will often look at the language from the viewpoints of marginalized populations.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement

ENG-230 TOPICS IN FILM STUDY (4)
(Cross-listed with WS-229 when topic applies)

ENG-230A: FILM AS ART: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (4)
This course will focus on the basics of film as an art. Fundamental elements of film, such as editing, sound, cinematography, and mise-en-scene will be explored in relation to the particular storytelling power of films. Emphasis will also be placed on the nature of narrative form in film. Attention will also be paid to the ideological dimension of film and to selected issues in film history and theory. Films for analysis will be drawn from both Hollywood and international cinemas. Special Unit on Irish Film for Global Awareness: Ireland when scheduled.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-230B: WORLDS IN A FRAME: AN INTERNATIONAL HISTORY OF FILM (4)
Film has been one of the most influential art forms since its inception over one hundred years ago. To study the history of film is to understand how film form and technique have been established and transformed over time. This course will focus on key moments in the development of cinema such as German Impressionism, Russian Montage, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and the Hollywood Renaissance. We will study as test cases the work of such major world film directors as Griffith, Eisenstein, Welles, Hitchcock, Truffaut, and Kar-wai.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-234 TOPICS IN SHAKESPEARE  (4)
Thematic, generic or period studies (for example, The Elizabethan Plays, The Tragedies or Shakespeare and Race). Approved topics listed below.
Prerequisite: ENG-110
Counts toward pre-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with AS-313 when topic applies)

ENG-234A: SHAKESPEARE AND THE MODERN WORLD (4)
Even after his death, Shakespeare continues to create. His plays are extraordinarily successful because they are so endlessly adaptable. Japanese films, African dramas, and American novels have all taken Shakespeare's plays as powerful pre-texts for their own works, which fill in blanks, offer alternative perspectives, critique, and remake. We will study a selection of Shakespeare’s works and the twentieth- and twenty-first century texts that revise them, both as comments upon Shakespeare and in their own right.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement

ENG-236 WORLD LITERATURE, 1500 BCE TO 1600 CE  (4)
This course considers the first three millennia of literature in Asia, Africa, and Europe. We will study texts from the following periods: ancient Middle East; ancient Egypt; ancient Greece; early China; India's heroic age; the Roman empire; early Christian Europe; India's classical age; China's middle period; the rise of Islam; Islam's golden age; medieval Europe; Japan's golden age; the Mali empire; Renaissance Europe.
Counts toward pre-1800 requirement

ENG-280 PERSPECTIVES ON LITERATURE  (4)
The foundation course for the English major, introducing both methods of literary research and major concepts, concerns, and figures in contemporary literary theory. This course is designed to make us more intentional readers and writers. As we learn about the assumptions and approaches of selected literary critics and theorists, we will become more aware of our own assumptions and more deliberate about our approaches as critical and creative readers and writers of literature.
Prerequisite: one 200-level English course

ENG-306 AUTHORIAL STUDIES (4)
Focuses on the work of one or two major figures in context (for example, Chaucer, Milton, Austen, Richardson and Fielding or Morrison). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward pre-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-306 when topic applies)

ENG-306A: BURNEY AND AUSTEN (4)
This course will juxtapose the work of Jane Austen with that of Frances Burney, who greatly influenced Austen and was a significant author in her own right. We will study their novels as they build on and depart from crucial social constructions of courtship, love, and proper conduct for young women especially. We will also explore how their writing reaches beyond these topics and addresses economic, political, and philosophical matters. Many of these issues will come together as we consider the perceived and real roles of women authors in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Readings will include Burney's first two novels, three novels by Austen, and selected letters and journal entries.

ENG-306B: DANTE (4)
The Divine Comedy is the crowning achievement of the man Chaucer considered the greatest poet of the modern world. Dante is still a living presence in our world, and writers from Longfellow to Joyce to contemporary poets like Amiri Baraka, Galway Kinnell, and Carolyn Forche have paid tribute to his power and to his vision of the universe and of the human social, political, and moral condition. The Divine Comedy is both an intensely personal and political statement and the grand synthesis of what we now call medieval thought. The course starts with the Vita Nuova, but its main work is to read the Commedia in English translation, in its historical contexts and in relation to our own lives and times.

ENG-310 STUDIES IN EARLY LITERATURE (4)
Thematic or generic studies in medieval and early modern literatures (for example, Love and Poetry in the Middle Ages or Medieval and Renaissance Drama). Approved topics are listed below.
Counts toward pre-1800 requirement

ENG-310A: RACE IN SHAKESPEARE (4)
Just as the Dark Lady haunts Shakespeare’s sonnets, so issues of race, gender and sexuality permeate plays such as Othello, Titus Andronicus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, and The Tempest. How did the yearly modern period perceive the Moor, the Jew, and the Native American, and how did it perceive the nature of cultural and physical difference? We will examine these and other questions in this course, including how the plays have been adapted, rewritten, and analyzed in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries.

ENG-310B: MEDIEVAL ROMANCE (4)
British and continental romance, including Old French works in translation (the lais of Marie de France), Middle English chivalric works (Sir Orfeo, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), and satires and parodies ("The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnell," Chaucer's Tale of Sir Thopas), and modern responses like Monty Python and the Holy Grail. How did the medieval period imagine itself? How did medieval authors react to those images? How does medieval imagination interact with ours? Should we see old literature as a familiar presence or a cross-cultural experience?

ENG-310C: THE FOLKTALE IN EARLY BRITISH LITERATURE (4)
This course considers international folktales as sources for medieval and early modern British literature, including Beowulf, Marie de France’s Lais, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Canterbury Tales, The Second Shepherd’s Play, The Old Wife’s Tale and King Lear.

ENG-310D: THE TALE IN EARLY WORLD LITERATURE (4)
Across centuries and continents, collections of short narratives have caught the imaginations of writers and readers. These compendia of tales, often bound by an
encompassing frame-story, have travelled through time and space to become some of the most famous works of world literature: Ovid's Metamophoses, The Arabian Nights, Somadeva's Ocean of Story, Boccaccio's Decameron, and Perrault's collection
of fairy tales. Expansive by nature, these texts have invited revision, addition, and adaptation. Both the content of the stories and the structure of the collections seem to have transcended linguistic, historical, and geographical boundaries to create a tradition of the genre, although one that is often overlooked in favor of the epic or lyric poem. We will examine texts from the first to the seventeenth centuries CE, from India, the Middle East, and Europe.

ENG-317 STUDIES IN RESTORATION AND 18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE  (4)
Thematic, generic or period studies (for example: The Colonial Imagination or Forms of Fiction). Approved topics are listed below.
Counts toward pre-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-317)

ENG-317A: SEX, TEXTS, AND COUNTERTEXTS, 1660-1800 (4)
Poetry, plays, and novels written in the late seventeeth- and eighteenth-centuries often imitate, satirize, adapt, or otherwise respond to each other, creating a lively sense of interplay and dialogue – very frequently about sexual themes. Focusing on historically situated constructions of gender and sexuality, we will explore how works by Wycherley, Behn, Rochester, Pope, Finch, Richardson, Fielding, and Burney talk to each other about such topics as seduction, honor, courtship, impotence, and rape.

ENG-317B: THE COLONIAL IMAGINATION (4)
A study of how fiction, drama, letters, poetry, and nonfiction of the late seventeenth- and eighteenth-centuries represent English encounters with other peoples and cultures. We will explore how these representations are themselves part of the colonial project, reinforcing English domination and exploitation; how factors such as gender and class complicate our understanding of colonial situations, and how colonized peoples co-opt and subvert elements of English culture in their own literatures. Authors include Behn, Defoe, Swift, Equiano.

ENG-320 LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS (4)
In-depth examination of the themes that permeate current offerings from the world of publishing for children and young adults; emphasis on the following topics: literary theory, cultural representation, censorship issues, aesthetics, bibliotherapy, and pedagogical implications.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with EDU-320)

ENG-321 STUDIES IN ROMANTICISM (4)
Thematic, generic or period studies (for example, British Romantic Writers, Transatlantic Romanticisms, Romanticism Through the Ages, or Romanticism, Orientalism and Imperialism). Approved topics are listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement.

ENG-321A: BRITISH ROMANTIC POETRY (4)
This course focuses on one of the most remarkable periods of creativity in English literary history that signaled the decline of old feudal structures and ushered in an era of individualism, political revolution, and democratic values. Paradoxically, it also ended up generating a sense of revolutionary elitism and notions of artistic autonomy and cultural superiority that came to represent an important feature of European, and, of course, British, imperialism. Romantic writers, in turn, were heavily influenced by the Orient and freely appropriated its texts, aesthetics, and themes even as they satirized its mores and manners. In this course we shall trace the genesis of the Romantic movement in the reaffirmation of feeling and emotion over the classical (and Enlightenment) values of reason and restraint and study the relationship of the writers and their works to nature, imagination, and folklore, as also to political and cultural changes in England and to the grand design of empire building that was in full swing at this time. Course texts may include writings by, among others, William Jones, Helen Maria Williams, Charlotte Smith, Edmund Burke, Robert Burns, Anna Barbauld, William Blake, Hannah More Robert Southey, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas Moore, Byron, the Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats.

ENG-321B: GETTING MEDIEVAL (4)
With Malory's fifteenth century Le Morte d’Arthur as a starting point, the course explores the ways in which medieval chivalry has been nostalgized and mythologized by later ages. Other readings include such works as Scott's Ivanhoe, Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Connie Willis's Doomsday Book, Michael Crichton's Timeline, John Le Carré's The Honourable Schoolboy, and film versions of the Arthurian cycle. How do we construct our images of the past? Why are we fascinated with the Middle Ages, and what do the forms of our fascination tell us about ourselves?

ENG-322 STUDIES IN 19TH-CENTURY LITERATURE (4)
Thematic, generic or period studies (for example, Victorian Historicism, The Realist Novel or 19th-Century Poetry), including courses that combine British and American literature. Approved topics are listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-322 when topic applies)

ENG-322A: VICTORIAN POETRY AND PROSE (4)
We shall focus our study on the many varieties of Victorian Bildungsroman—the novel of self-development, male and female—and through it examine issues pertaining to self-perception and identity formation, gender dynamics and gender difference, women’s rights and the woman question, relationship between self and work, between the provincial locale and the metropolis, between England and the Empire, between art and artistic pursuit, and explore the effects of industrialization, scientific and technological innovation, and social and political change on society and the individual. Texts include works by Charles Dickens, W.M. Thackeray, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy.

ENG-322B: THE WOMAN QUESTION IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE (4)
Questions about the present and future roles of women in domestic and public life animate much of Victorian literature. This course examines the complex, changing situation of women as explored and imagined in the poetry, fiction, and prose of writers such as the Brontes, Gaskell, Mill, Tennyson, Martineau, E. Browning, C. Rossetti, Meredith, Hardy, and others.

ENG-324 CONTEMPORARY THEATRE (4)
A study of current theatrical practice including background from significant movements in the 2oth century. In addition to important American commercial productions, topics may include fringe and alternative theatre, international artists and considerations of selected locales.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with THE-325)

ENG-325 STUDIES IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (4)
Thematic, generic or period studies (for example, The African-American Novel or Major African-American Writers). Approved topics are listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-325 when topic applies and AS-325)

ENG-325A: BELOVED AND BEFORE: THE NOVELS OF TONI MORRISON (4)
This course will survey the novels of Toni Morrison who is the first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. We will focus on her position within the American and African American literary canons as well as on the global implications of her writing. Her fiction will also be placed in its social, cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts. Special attention will be paid to the themes of race and identity, history and memory, the individual and community, and the nature of motherhood. We will also pay attention to the production and reception of her work.

ENG-325B: AFRICAN AMERICAN FICTION AND FILM (4)
The African American novel has proven to be a vibrant and resilient form, giving expression to the experiences and concerns of black people for more than 150 years. Through the representational potentialities provided by fiction, black writers have given witness and testimony to a people’s quest for freedom, identity, justice, and equality. A primary category of analysis will be gender, as the reading list will consist of paired texts by female and male writers. A special film component will be available for film studies credit.

ENG-330 STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE (4)
Studies focusing on specific traditional, marginal or innovative literary genres (for example, Modern Drama, Autobiography or The Graphic Novel). Approved topics are listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-330A: GRAPHIC NOVELS (4)
This class looks at the recent explosion in comics. Topics include history of comics in newspapers and counterculture magazines; the rise of graphic memoir; comics theory. Scott McCloud, Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechtel, Mat Johnson, Alan Moore, Marjane Satrapi, and others.

ENG-330B: LIFE WRITING (4)
From genres like captivity narratives, slave narratives, and commonplace books, to contemporary iterations in memoir, blogs, and reality television, literary life writing matters. Life narratives demand that readers attend to histories, lives, languages, and experiences that are often unfamiliar or different from their own. Reading transnational self-representational texts raises questions about ethics, veracity, memory, and subjectivity, and we will explore these issues and others as we examine how life writers understand and represent selfhood, addressing inherent implications of reading stories of others’ lives.

ENG-340 STUDIES IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY (4)
Exploration of constructions and representations of gender and sexual identities in literature (for example, Lesbian Novel, American Genders and Sexualities).
(Cross-listed with WS-345)

ENG-345 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (4)
Thematic, generic or period studies (for example, The American Renaissance or American Realism and Naturalism). Approved topics listed below.
Prerequisite: 200-level literature course
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-344 when topic applies)

ENG-345A: TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL (4)
Suggesting that, contrary to popular opinion, the genre of the novel is neither dead nor on the decline, this course attends to questions of style, authorship, and reception of novels in the twentieth century against the backdrop of the century’s diverse cultural, economic, and political history. We will engage innovations in the form, investigate how novels participate in or contribute to various literary and social movements, and examine the role of the novel in constructions of American identities from a variety of perspectives.

ENG-345B: SCRIBBLING WOMEN: 19th CENTURY AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS (4)
According to critic Nina Baym, from 1820-1870 there were forty-eight women writers who produced 130 novels that constitute the genre of the sentimental novel or woman’s fiction. This course will study woman’s fiction as both social commentary and literary art. We will pay close attention to how and why these works which were tremendously popular in their time have been ignored by literary history. Texts will include fiction by such writers as Maria Cummins, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Stoddard and Sarah Orne Jewett.

ENG-345C: AMERICAN MODERNISM (4)
Between World War I and World War II the American Modernists changed the face of literature, working from urban and rural spaces, in and outside the borders of the United States. This course will study the texts of the American Modernists, exploring the different ways in which this group contested conventions and created a new space for American artists by continuously challenging perceptions of art and trying to remake old traditions in modern ways. Readings will include both canonical and neglected works from authors such as William Faulkner, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, and Jessie Redmon Fauset. In addition to literary examples of Modernism students will examine different media from the period, including film and music.

ENG-350 STUDIES IN MODERNISM (4)
Thematic or generic studies (for example, Modern Poetry, or Virginia Woolf and Modernism). Approved topics are listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-350)

ENG-350A: MODERN POETRY (4)
Study of beautiful, difficult Modernist poetry, 1890-1950. Discussions will range from geopolitics to metaphysics and back again, frequently within a single poem. Readings will include Frost, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, HD, Stein, Moore, Williams, Stevens, Hughes, Brown, and Auden.

ENG-350B: LOVE AND MONEY IN THE MODERN BRITISH NOVEL (4)
The marriage plot is central to 19th-century British novels, but not to their 20th-century counterparts. What caused this shift? Modernism is one answer: an early twentieth-century movement that represented a break with the assumptions, attitudes, and literary conventions of the preceding century. Modernist writers didn’t stop writing about love, money, and social class, but industrial capitalism, urbanization, World War I and changing ideas about gender and sexuality meant that marriage was no longer the plot resolution of choice. This course will explore the shifting concerns and strategies of British novelists in the Modernist period by studying one pre-Modernist novel (The Odd Women), four Modernist novels (Howard’s End, Women in Love, Mrs. Dalloway, Nightwood), and one postmodern novel (Money).

ENG-350C: WOOLF, JOYCE, AND CONSCIOUSNESS (4)
This course will look closely at two great experimentalists, Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, along with their sources, influences, and historical and political contexts. Readings cover some of the most important modernist novels, including To the Lighthouse and Ulysses.

ENG-350D: WOMEN’S VOICES IN MODERN IRISH LITERATURE (4)
While women writers have always contributed to Irish literature, their voices and works have achieved new distinction and resonance in the modern era, whether the subject be growing up and living in a colony or a divided country, domestic life, romance, politics, the position of women, social criticism, or art. This course examines the poetry, novels, plays, and memoirs of modern Irish women writers as they address the evolving problem of what it means to be Irish, and as they identify and pursue new topics for present and future artistic exploration. We will read works by writers such as Sydney Owenson, Edith Somerville and Martin Ross, Augusta Gregory, Elizabeth Bowen, Kate O’Brien, Mary Lavin, Eavan Boland, Clare Boylan, Deirdre Madden, Jennifer Johnston, Marie Jones, Edna O’Brien, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Marina Carr, and others.

ENG-350E: GLOBAL MODERNISM (4)
The literary movement known as Modernism, framed by the two world wars in the west, was one of the most innovative periods of aesthetic innovation since the Renaissance. In Virginia Woolf's words, Modernist artists sought to create "new forms for our new sensations." Although originating in Europe, the movement has had a global impact and influence. This course will begin by analyzing European
Modernism in the context of WWI and by studying some of its best-known contributors. The second half of the course will examine some representative examples of texts that complicate and expand our understanding of Modernism. Texts will include World War One British Poets; Mrs. Dalloway; Ah-Q and Other Tales of China; Cane; and selected stories by Franz Kafka.

ENG-352 STUDIES IN POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE (4)
Study of literature written in nations that were formerly European colonies (for example, the literature of South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand and Canada). Approved topics listed below.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with AS-352)

ENG-352A: LITERATURE OF SOUTH ASIA, MIDDLE EAST, AND AFRICA (4)
Using a historical introduction to provide a background for the debates involving the postcolonial condition and the struggle for personal, cultural, and/or national autonomy in formerly colonized areas or states, we shall proceed to an overview of the field of postcolonial literary theory to establish the context for our study before looking at postcolonial literature and films from former British colonies (and areas formerly under British control) in South-Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Occasionally, translations from works in the indigenous languages may be introduced to highlight contrasts and correspondences with work originally composed in English, or give a more inclusive view of the range and nature of responses to the colonial experience in these areas. Texts to be selected from works by, among others, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Sara Suleri, Bapsi Sidhwa, Mohsin Hamid, Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Ghassan Kanafani, Furugh Farrukhzad, Mahmoud Darwish, Adonis, Sami-ul-Qasim, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugi wa Thiongo, Tayyib Salih, Ama Ata Aidoo, and Bessie Head.

ENG-355 STUDIES IN 20TH-CENTURY AND CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (4)
Studies of themes in recent literature (for example, Postmodernism, Transatlantic Literature, or Postwar Literature). Approved topics listed below; topic(s) offered alternate years.
Counts toward pre-1800 or post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-355 when topic applies)

ENG-355A: TRANSNATIONAL FICTION (4)
What happens when writers move between literary traditions? How do exiled and expatriate writers reconcile competing loyalties? And how does their work affect the national literatures they become part of? Authors may include Conrad, Rhys, Nabokov, Rushdie, Kincaid, and Chabon.

ENG-360 STUDIES IN FILM AND MEDIA 
Thematic, aesthetic, generic, historical, cultural or theoretical explorations of issues in film and media studies. Approved topics listed below.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement

ENG-360A: FILM AND FASHION (4)
This course will explore the relationship between film and fashion: how the film medium and film culture further the agendas of the fashion industry and how fashion as a category of meaning shapes film narratives.

ENG-370 STUDIES IN ETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURE (4)
A critical analysis of a specific topic, genre, or period in Latino literature and other English-language media produced in the United States.
Counts toward post-1800 requirement
(Cross-listed with WS-370 when topic applies and SPA-370)

ENG-370A: LATINA/O AMERICAN LITERATURE (4)
Examining debates over “authenticity” and negotiating cultural nationalism, the influences of global conflict, and the resonances of cultural memory, the readings in this course ask students to consider the balance these works and their authors create between autonomous, individual literary expressions and larger community affiliations.

ENG-370B: ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (4)
Examining debates over “authenticity” and negotiating cultural nationalism, American popular culture, the influences of global conflict and the resonances of cultural memory, American immigration policies, cultural continuity, and nostalgia, the readings in this course ask students to consider the balance these works and their authors create between autonomous, individual literary expressions and their larger community affiliations. We will examine a variety of texts written by Asian Americans, across genres and stemming from multiple traditions, to consider literary representations of Asian American experiences.

ENG-410 DIRECTED READING (1-4)
Directed reading courses are open to qualified juniors and seniors to pursue reading outside a program's listed courses. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the Catalog for more information.

ENG-440 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-4)
Directed research courses are open to junior and senior majors to work with a faculty member on a project related to particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the Catalog for more information.

ENG-450 INTERNSHIP (1-4)
Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the catalog for more information.

ENG-490 SENIOR THESIS 4
A senior thesis gives superior students the opportunity to write a thesis about a project related to particular field of intellectual or artistic interest. Please see the Special Curricular Opportunities section of the Catalog for more information.

Creative Writing
ENG-200 INTRODUCTION TO NONFICTION WRITING (4)
An introduction to the craft of nonfiction writing focusing on the rhetorical skills underlying journalism (news, editorials, interviews and features) and other forms, such as the essay.

ENG-201 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING (4)
Principles and forms of narrative writing. Illustrative readings and frequent writing.

ENG-202 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING (4)
An introduction to the craft of poetry, through regular written assignments and readings in a variety of contemporary poets and poetic movements and traditions.

ENG-203 DRAMATIC WRITING (I-4)
Principles of the craft of the playwright with an emphasis on dramatic structure and the resources of the theatre through the reading of play scripts and the writing of a one-act play.
(Cross-listed with THE-203)

ENG-204 TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING (1-3)
Topics in creative writing, including courses taught by visiting writers.

ENG-205 TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING (4 )
Topics in creative writing, including courses taught by visiting writers. Specific topics will be announced before spring course selection.
(Cross-listed with THE-205, when the topic pertains to dramatic writing)

ENG-205A GEEKY RAPTURES: SCIENCE AND POETRY AS CO-CONSPIRATORS (4)
By reading and discussing works by established voices in both science and poetry, we will cultivate our “geeky rapture” and develop writing practices that draw from both the arts and sciences – an osmosis offering endless sources of artistic possibility.

ENG-206 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (4)
A multigenre course that will introduce students to writing in the forms and modes of creative non-fiction (personal essay, new journalism, memoir, travel writing and the lyric essay), fiction, including microfiction and short story, and poetry (prose, narrative, and lyric), and dramatic writing.

ENG-207 WRITERS’ FESTIVAL CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR (1)
This intensive course in creative writing will meet in the two weeks leading up to the annual Writers’ Festival and be taught by one of the guest writers for the festival. The focus of the course will vary with the writer designing it. Possibilities include Writing as Discovery, Writing and History, and Multicultural Women’s Voice.
Prerequisite: 200-level creative writing course

ENG-300 NONFICTION WORKSHOP  (4)
Intermediate nonfiction writing with emphasis on the personal essay, the memoir, experimental forms, theory and practice of craft, oral interpretation, and presentation and discussion of student work.
Prerequisite: ENG-200, ENG-205 (if in nonfiction), or ENG-206

ENG-301 FICTION WORKSHOP (4)
Intermediate fiction writing. Readings in theory and practice; the writing and rewriting of a group of stories. Individual conferences and group sessions.
Prerequisite: ENG-201, ENG-205 (if in fiction), or ENG-206

ENG-302 POETRY WORKSHOP (4)
Intermediate poetry writing. Presentation and discussion of student work and exploration of poetic craft and current issues in poetry and poetics.
Prerequisite: ENG-202, ENG-205 (if in poetry), or ENG-206

ENG-303 DRAMATIC WRITING II  (4)
Principles of the craft of the screenwriter with an emphasis on film structure and format through reading of screenplays and writing of a feature-length scenario.
Prerequisite: ENG-203 or ENG-205 (if in dramatic writing)
Offered alternate years
(Cross-listed with THE-303)

ENG-346 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP I (2)
Readings in theory and practice; writing and rewriting of a group of stories or poems.
Prerequisite: ENG-206

ENG-347 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP II (2)
In this workshop, we will investigate a wide range of poetic traditions, forms, and issues. Through in-class writing exercises, reading of model poems, and discussion of student work, we will expand our poetic vocabularies and imaginative capabilities. The course will culminate with each student compiling a final portfolio of thoroughly revised poems.
Prerequisite: ENG-206 or ENG-202

ENG-415 DIRECTED STUDY IN CREATIVE WRITING (2-4)
Advanced study in literary craft under the supervision of a department member
Prerequisite: 300-level course in the chosen genre and permission of the instructor

ENG-481 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CREATIVE WRITING (4)
This capstone course enables the senior English major to complete an independent creative writing project in a seminar setting. The seminar provides a creative context that fosters imagination, originality, and attention to all aspects of craft. Students generate substantial original projects based on previous coursework, relevant reading, and research and also write an accompanying craft essay. Working with a faculty advisor and in workshops with other students in the seminar, the student develops a substantial piece of writing, revises the work to a high standard, and presents a portion of the work at public reading. For the relationship of this seminar to senior thesis, see ENG-490 (senior thesis in literature or creative writing) above.
Prerequisite: must be a senior English Literature-creative writing major and have taken two creative writing courses, at least one at the 300 level.