Keynote Speaker: Leymah Gbowee 

_leymah-gbowee.jpg

2011 Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee is a Liberian peace activist, trained social worker and women’s rights advocate. She currently serves as Executive Director of the Women, Peace and Security Program at Columbia University’s Earth Institute and is the founder and current President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa, the founding head of the Liberia Reconciliation Initiative, and co-founder and former Executive Director of Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WIPSEN-A). She is also a founding member and former Liberian Coordinator of Women in Peacebuilding Network/West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (WIPNET/WANEP). Ms. Gbowee’s leadership of the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace – which brought together Christian and Muslim women in a nonviolent movement that played a pivotal role in ending Liberia’s civil war in 2003 – is chronicled in her memoir, Mighty Be Our Powers, and in the award-winning documentary, Pray the Devil Back to Hell. She holds an M.A. in Conflict Transformation and a Doctor of Laws honoris causa.

Ms. Gbowee is an advisor for numerous organizations and has held distinguished fellowships at Barnard College and Union Theological Seminary. She serves as a Sustainable Development Goals Advocate for the United Nations and as a Member of the World Refugee Council. In 2016, she was awarded the Lifetime Africa Achievement Prize for Peace in Africa by the Millennium Excellence Foundation. In 2017, she was selected by the UN Secretary-General to serve as a Member of his High-Level Advisory Board on Mediation. In 2018, she was appointed to the G7 Gender Equality Advisory Council during Canada's G7 Presidency.

 

 

Distinguished Speaker: Brooke Baldwin 

brooke-baldwin-unapporved-photo.png

 

 

Brooke Baldwin is a Peabody Award finalist who anchors the 2 – 4 p.m. edition of CNN Newsroom. She is also the creator and host of CNN’s Digital series “American Woman” which focuses on the stories of trailblazing women who have broken barriers in their respective fields and are now helping other women do the same. In addition to holding down two hours in the studio. Baldwin is often sent into the field to the biggest breaking stories in the US and around the world. 

Baldwin joined CNN after serving as a lead reporter for the 10 p.m. newscast for WTTG in Washington, D.C., where she covered the shooting massacres at both Virginia Tech and the West Nicle Mines School, a one-room Amish schoolhouse in southeastern Pennsylvania. At WOWK in Charleston/Huntington, West Virginia, she was the morning anchor and reported on the Sago Mine collapse and Martha Stewart’s release from federal prison. She began her news broadcasting career at WVIR in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Baldwin earned a double bachelor’s degree in journalism and Spanish from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.